illness

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an attack of (some illness)

A sudden or acute onset of (an illness). I went to bed early last night after an attack of indigestion.
See also: attack, of

down with (an illness)

Sick with a particular illness, which is named after "with." I've been down with the flu all week and have barely gotten out of bed.
See also: down

shake off

1. To rid or free oneself from someone or something that one finds aggravating, upsetting, or annoying. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shake" and "off." My little brother has been following me around all day. I need to shake him off. He had a hard time shaking off the feeling that someone was spying on him.
2. To shake something in order to get something off of it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shake" and "off." I had to shake off the old tarp to get the bugs and dirt off of it. Shake the blanket off before you lay it out.
3. To dislodge or get rid of something by shaking. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shake" and "off." He tried to shake the tick off, but it had dug itself into his skin. Don't shake the mud off inside—go out in the back yard and do it!
4. To recover from or fend off a disease or illness, especially a minor one. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shake" and "off." I've got to shake this tummy bug off—I can't afford to be sick before our big meeting! I've had this cold for nearly a week that I just can't seem to shake off! I could feel myself getting sick, but I managed to shake it off.
See also: off, shake

produce an attack (of some illness)

To trigger a sudden or acute onset of some illness or its symptoms. All of the dust in the air produced an attack of asthma. After living with epilepsy for so long, I've learned to recognize what will produce an attack.
See also: attack, produce

suffer an attack of (some illness)

To be stricken by a sudden or acute onset of some kind of illness or its symptoms. I went to bed early last night after suffering a severe attack of indigestion. He suffered an asthma attack halfway through the hike.
See also: attack, of, suffer

shake a disease or illness off

Fig. [for the body] to fight off a disease or illness. I thought I was catching a cold, but I guess I shook it off. I hope I can shake off this flu pretty soon.
See also: disease, illness, off, shake

shake someone or something off

Fig. to get rid of someone; to get free of someone who is bothering you. Stop bothering me! What do I have to do to shake you off? I wish I could shake off John. He's such a pest!
See also: off, shake

shake something off

to get rid of something that is on one by shaking. (See also shake a disease or illness off.) I tried to shake the spider off. The dog shook off the blanket Billy had put on him.
See also: off, shake

shake off

Free oneself or get rid of something or someone, as in I've had a hard time shaking off this cold, or She forged ahead, shaking off all the other runners. It is also put as give someone the shake, as in We managed to give our pursuers the shake. The first term dates from the late 1300s; the slangy variant dates from the second half of the 1800s.
See also: off, shake

shake off

v.
1. To shake something so as to dislodge what is on it: We shook off the picnic blanket to get rid of the grasshoppers. I picked up the beach towel and shook it off.
2. To get rid of something by shaking: The dog climbed out of the creek and shook off the water. I shook the snow off my jacket and hung it up.
3. To free oneself of something; get rid of something: We shook off our fear and proceeded into the dark cave. The injured player shook the pain off and continued to play.
See also: off, shake
References in periodicals archive ?
Tracking residential outcomes of supported independent living programs for persons with serious mental illness.
In addition to obtaining household-level information, we attempted to interview each person (or an available proxy) who became ill within 72 hr of eating fish to assess illness onset, symptoms, species, and actual size of the fish participants believed had made them sick, and associated treatment and medical care costs.
Kreuger (1990) and Hirsch, Mcpherson, and DuMond (1997) use individual level data, but still are only able to look at the determinants of an individual's decision to file, without conditioning on whether the individual has actually experienced a work-related injury or illness.
Her anger is completely independent of any severe depressive illnesss.
SUPPORT: Trish, left, says pals like Julia Lowe helped her beat illnesss
Dr Melissa Hack, lead consultant at the Gwent Sleep Centre, based in the Royal Gwent Hospital in Newport, said jobs with irregular shift patterns could produce a an illnesss called sleep apnoea.
And if my experience is anything to go by, Darren could return twice the player he was before his illnesss.
FROM 'feed a cold and starve a fever' to guzzling chicken soup to overcome the flu, most of us have tried one of these unproven methods to beat an illness.
Veterans of the Gulf War have been battling for seven years to convince successive Governments that their illness is real.