tie the knot

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tie the knot

To get married. An allusion to the handfasting ceremony, an ancient tradition of binding the hands of the bride and groom with lengths of cloth, cord, rope, etc., as a symbol of their lasting union. All of my friends have tied the knot and started having kids. John and Mary are tying the knot this summer in France.
See also: knot, tie
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

tie (with someone) (for something)

to have the same score as someone for the prize in some contest. I tied with Joel for first place. I tied for the trophy with Joel.

tie the knot

 
1. Fig. to marry a mate. We tied the knot in a little chapel on the Arkansas border. They finally tied the knot.
2. Fig. [for a cleric or other authorized person] to unite a couple in marriage. It was hard to find somebody to tie the knot at that hour. It only took a few minutes for the ship's captain to tie the knot.
See also: knot, tie
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tie the knot

Get married; also, perform a marriage ceremony. For example, So when are you two going to tie the knot? or They asked their friend, who is a judge, to tie the knot. [Early 1700s]
See also: knot, tie
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tie the knot

INFORMAL
COMMON If two people tie the knot, they get married. The couple tied the knot last year after a 13-year romance. Len tied the knot with Kate five years ago. Note: Tying knots in items of clothing or ribbons worn by the bride and groom is a traditional feature of many wedding ceremonies, symbolizing their unity.
See also: knot, tie
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

tie the knot

get married. informal
See also: knot, tie
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

tie the ˈknot

(informal) get married: When did you two decide to tie the knot?
See also: knot, tie
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

tie the knot

1. tv. to marry a mate. We tied the knot in a little chapel on the Arkansas border.
2. tv. [for a cleric] to unite a couple in marriage. It was hard to find somebody to tie the knot at that hour.
See also: knot, tie
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

tie the knot

Slang
1. To get married.
2. To perform a marriage ceremony.
See also: knot, tie
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tie the knot, to

To get married. This expression dates from the sixteenth century, or rather, is an abbreviation of one used then. It originally was to tie a knot with one’s tongue that one cannot untie with one’s teeth, and so appeared in several earlier printed sources as well as in John Ray’s 1670 proverb collection. The analogy is clear: the bonds of marriage are viewed as a knot, which, were it of string or cord, could be undone with the teeth—in other words, an early mixed metaphor. Although the full saying still appears in Rustic Speech, a collection by E. M. Wright published in 1913, all but “tie the knot” had long been dropped and survives as the current cliché, although in this age of relatively common and simple divorces it may be obsolescent.
See also: tie, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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