flesh and blood, I'm only/one's own

(redirected from I'm only/one's own flesh and blood)

(one's) (own) flesh and blood

One's family member(s). You're my own flesh and blood—how you could you steal my story idea? She's our flesh and blood, so let's all try to get along with her while she's in town.
See also: and, blood, flesh

be only flesh and blood

1. To have human flaws and thus be imperfect. I know you idolize me, but I'm only flesh and blood, just like you—I make mistakes too! I don't condone him for giving in to temptation, but I don't blame him, either. Like any of us, he's only flesh and blood.
2. To be unable to do things that are beyond the means of a mortal human. I don't know how the boss thinks we can get all this work done before the Christmas deadline. We're only flesh and blood!
See also: and, blood, flesh

flesh and blood

1. The human body (and the limitations thereof). We need to get a crane to move this slab—it's too heavy for mere flesh and blood to handle.
2. Describing an actual, living person. It's hard to think of these relatives that I've never met as flesh and blood people.
3. One's relative(s). In this usage, "own" can be used before "flesh." You're my own flesh and blood—how could you spill my secrets to the tabloids? She's our flesh and blood, so let's all try to get along with her while she's in town.
4. An entity possessing life-like qualities. A skilled writer can take wooden characters and turn them into flesh and blood.
5. Human, and therefore flawed and imperfect. I know you idolize me, but I'm flesh and blood, just like you—I make mistakes too.
See also: and, blood, flesh
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

flesh and blood, I'm only/one's own

I’m only human; members of my family. The pairing of flesh and blood dates back very far. In English it appears in the Bible (Matthew 16:17; Ephesians 6:12), Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar (3.1: “and men are flesh and blood, and apprehensive”), and numerous other writings, mostly in the meaning of being only human (Thomas Hood, “The Song of the Shirt”: “Oh God! that bread should be so dear and flesh and blood so cheap!”). The other sense, of blood relations, appeared in a 1300 manuscript (“He . . . es your aun fless and blod”), and numerous other early sources, as well as in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice (where Gobbo says to his son, “If thou be Launcelot, thou art mine own flesh and blood,” 2.2).
See also: and, flesh, own
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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