I'm all right, Jack

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I'm all right, Jack

The notion of self-centered complacency, i.e., of being satisfied or happy with one's circumstances, and thus unconcerned with anyone else's. Often used as a modifier before a noun, though typically not hyphenated. Primarily heard in UK. What's most interesting is that people who get supplementary income from the government are more likely to have an "I'm all right, Jack" attitude about welfare, tending to oppose broadening the scope to include others who earn less money each week, or none at all.
See also: all, jack

I'm all right, Jack

People say I'm all right, Jack to mean that their own situation is good and they do not care about anyone else. It's easy to think only of yourselves, say `I'm all right Jack' and sign the contract. Note: I'm all right, Jack is used before nouns to describe this kind of attitude. That's a bit of an I'm all right Jack attitude isn't it?
See also: all, jack

I'm all right, Jack

used to express or comment upon selfish complacency. informal
I'm all right, Jack was an early 20th-century catchphrase which became the title of a 1959 British film.
See also: all, jack

I’m all ˈright, Jack

(British English, informal) used by or about somebody who is happy with their own life and does not care about other people’s problems: He has a typical ‘I’m all right, Jack’ attitude — as long as he’s doing well he doesn’t care about anyone else.
See also: all, jack
References in periodicals archive ?
The Huyton cinema reportedly closed on April 30, 1960 when it screened I'm All Right Jack starring Ian Carmichael.
With so many jobs in the Clwyd/ Deeside area dependent on Airbus, the cavalier, "I'm all right Jack" attitude of the aforementioned gentlemen is startling, to say the least.
I feel that we are in an "I'm all right Jack" kind of place and really, before anyone is killed, I urge my fellow road users to have a little common sense and think about someone else.
Although I was only five years his junior, I was playing Peter Sellers' daughter in I'm All Right Jack. I'd first met him during my earliest days on television.
Each of us is entitled to our opinion but some powerful, well-to-do "I'm all right Jack" officials seem concerned only with their own well-paid jobs and completely unconcerned with the wishes of the electorate who voted them in.
So next time you see your MP on television, hear him/her on the radio, or in the newspaper, saying he or she cares about their constituents, don't believe a word they say, because they are all singing from the same hymnsheet, and the hymn they are singing is called Up Yours, I'm All Right Jack.
In 1959 Muriel played the part of an announcer in the Peter Sellers film I'm All Right Jack, a role you could say she was made for.
Whatever the state of the nation back then - knee deep in austerity, still reeling from the global financial crisis - film director Danny Boyle and his cast and crew of thousands managed to create something so incredibly special and rousing that for a fleeting moment there was no them and us, no in or out, no go or stay, no I'm all right Jack, pull the ladder up - just a warm air of welcome, of inclusion and unity, which simultaneously managed to celebrate all our differences as well as prompt us to forget them.
All of the hallmarks of the Tory "I'm all right Jack" attitude are in CT's letter.
When it comes to footballers and survival, it's always I'm all right Jack.
The "I'm all right Jack" syndrome and the fact that people are prone to believe what they want to believe combined with rising markets can lead to an irrational euphoria.
I'M ALL RIGHT JACK: Match-winner Collison is congratulated by Andy Carroll
Screwing as much as you can out of the benefits system became full-time work; the "I'm all right jack" mentality passed on in mother's milk.
This type of "I'm all right Jack" view reminded me of the Titanic survivor, who is alleged to have said: "It wasn't too bad a trip really.
He was once one of Britain's biggest box office stars, appearing as an upper class buffoon in 1950s comedies Lucky Jim, I'm All Right Jack and School For Scoundrels.