I'll say

I'll say

That's very true; I really agree; absolutely. A: "Wow, this bookshop has everything." B: "I'll say! I didn't even know copies of this book still existed!" A: "Did Billy enjoy his first day at school?" B: "I'll say he did! He didn't even want me to take him home at the end of the day."
See also: say

I'll say

Absolutely, I strongly agree. For example, Did you enjoy the film?-I'll say. This phrase is generally used alone and for emphasis. [First half of 1900s] For a synonym, see you can say that again.
See also: say
References in classic literature ?
Harnish, who are you?" And I'll say, 'I'm Elam Harnish's younger brother.
"'Yes, ma'am,' I'll say, 'Burning Daylight was a pretty good cuss, but it's better that he's gone.
I'll say that he is wise who loveth well, And that the soul most free is that most bound In thraldom to the ancient tyrant Love.
"I'll say a thank-you to him for that when I see him," said Anne, pulling easy chairs before the fire.
Give me the dog, and I'll say no more about the cat."
"I'll go to her; I'll ask her; I'll say for the last time: we are free, and hadn't we better stay so?
"Tom Sawyer," I says, "I'll say it again as I've said it a many a time before: I ain't fitten to black your boots.
I'll go a little further with you; I'll say something more."
I assure you I'll say my prayers with a right good-will tonight.
"I'll say it very quick," murmured the Other Professor, with downcast eyes, and melancholy voice, which contrasted oddly with his face, as he had forgotten to leave off smiling.
"I'll say good-night to you here," she said, holding out her hand.
"I'll say good-by by telegraph, when I get to London."
If you an't the devil, Tom, you 's his twin brother, I'll say that for ye!"
You just say, 'Because she is,' and I'll say it's mere assertion.
But one thing I'll say, and no more; if you spare me, bygones are bygones, and when you fellows are in court for piracy, I'll save you all I can.