humour

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Related to Humours: humoral theory

out of humour

In an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; not feeling well or in good spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because he's been rather out of humour lately. After living in Gibraltar for so long, these awful London winters leave me feeling me out of humour.
See also: humour, of, out

be put out of humour

old fashioned To be put in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to be made to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I must say, I was put quite out of humor to have been reprimanded like that in front of my colleagues. My wife is always being put out of humour by the cold weather in this part of the country.
See also: humour, of, out, put

feel out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because it seems like he's been feeling rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you always wake up feeling so out of humour in the morning.
See also: feel, humour, of, out

be out of humour

To be in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. I think something is bugging John because he's been rather out of humour lately. I think you should get to bed earlier because you're always so out of humour in the morning.
See also: humour, of, out

put (someone) out of humour

old fashioned To put someone in an irritable, grouchy, or unhappy mood; to make someone feel unwell, displeased, or in poor spirits. Primarily heard in UK. Having lived in Gibraltar for most of my life, where the weather remains temperate throughout the year, I must say that these awful London winters put me quite out of humour. It always puts me out of humour to think about the state of our country's political system for too long.
See also: humour, of, out, put

gallows humor

Humor that aims to make grim subjects, like death, funny or comical. (A "gallows" is the wooden frame from which criminals were traditionally hanged.) A: "Why would he say a morbid thing like that?" B: "Oh, that's just how Uncle Ned is—he's prone to gallows humor."
See also: humor

schoolboy humor

Immature humor. Guys, enough with the schoolboy humor. Let's try to act like adults, please.
See also: humor, schoolboy
References in classic literature ?
Did he say, for instance,' added Brass, in a kind of comfortable, cozy tone--'I don't assert that he did say so, mind; I only ask you, to refresh your memory--did he say, for instance, that he was a stranger in London--that it was not his humour or within his ability to give any references--that he felt we had a right to require them--and that, in case anything should happen to him, at any time, he particularly desired that whatever property he had upon the premises should be considered mine, as some slight recompense for the trouble and annoyance I should sustain--and were you, in short,' added Brass, still more comfortably and cozily than before, 'were you induced to accept him on my behalf, as a tenant, upon those conditions?
As it was clear that he was a choleric fellow in some respects, Mr Swiveller was relieved to find him in such good humour, and, to encourage him in it, smiled himself.
Let them know my humour,' said the single gentleman, rising.