homework

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Related to Homeworks: houseworks

do (one's) homework

1. Literally, to complete school work that has been assigned to be done at home. You can't watch any more television until you do your homework!
2. To be thoroughly prepared and informed for something, such as a meeting, interview, or report. Be sure you do your homework before heading into that meeting; there's a lot at stake, and no one's going to like it if you aren't up to speed.
See also: homework

the dog ate my homework

A hackneyed explanation for why one does not have their homework. A: "I can't tell my teacher that the dog ate my homework!" B: "Come on, a bad excuse is better than none."
See also: ate, dog, homework

(The) dog ate my homework

A poor excuse for something that someone has failed to do on time. (From an excuse a student might give for failing to turn in homework on time. Occurs in many variations.) The dog ate my homework, so I have nothing to turn in. (Used as an attributive.) Bob was late with his report and had nothing but his typical dog-ate-my-homework excuses.
See also: ate, dog, homework

do one's homework

Be well prepared, as in Steve had done his homework before the meeting and could answer all of the client's questions . This usage transfers a school assignment to a broader context. [c. 1930]
See also: homework

do your homework

If you do your homework, you prepare for something, especially by finding out information about it. Before you buy any shares, do your homework. Doing your homework before you make your request will help you to have a confident manner.
See also: homework

do your homework

examine thoroughly the details and background of a subject or topic, especially before giving your own views on it.
See also: homework

do your ˈhomework (on something)

find out the facts, details, etc. of a subject in preparation for a meeting, a speech, an article, etc: He had just not done his homework for the interview. He couldn’t answer our questions.
See also: homework

dog ate my homework, the

A ridiculous and obviously prevaricating excuse for failing to meet an obligation. It dates from the late 1900s and is so well known that a Boston Globe headline for a book review of The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains by Nicholas Carr played on it, “The Internet Ate My Brain” (June 6, 2010). A Washington Examiner column by Timothy P. Carney about a bill provision allowing the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to accept late applications for patent extensions called it “The Dog Ate My Homework Act” (March 20, 2010).
See also: ate, dog
References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, much is still to be revealed about teachers' homework practice and its relation to student outcomes.
(1998), 'Family Involvement With Children's Homework: An Intervention in the Middle Grades', Family Relations, 47, 149-57.
(1989), 'Synthesis of Research on Homework', Educational Leadership, November, 85-91.
(2007), The Battle Over Homework: Common Ground for Administrators, Teachers, and Parents (2nd ed.), Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
(1998), 'Relationships Among Attitudes About Homework, Amount of Homework Assigned and Completed, and Student Achievement', Journal of Educational Psychology, 90, 70-83.
(2006), 'Does Homework Improve Academic Achievement?
(2001), 'Using Research to Answer Practical Questions About Homework', Educational Psychologist, 36, 143-53.
(2000), Looking at Homework Differently', The Elementary School Journal, 100, 529-48.
(2012), Does Parental Homework Involvement Mediate the Relationship Between Family Background and Educational Outcomes?
(1985), A Factorial Experiment in Teachers' Written Feedback on Student Homework: Changing Teacher Behavior a Little Rather Than a Lot', Journal of Educational Psychology, 77, 162-73.
(2001), More Than Minutes: Teachers' Roles in Designing Homework', Educational Psychologist, 36, 181-93.
(2009), Elementary School teachers' Views About Homework Process in Science and Technology Course', Necatibey Faculty of Education Electronic Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 3 (1), 58-79.
Parental Involvement in Homework', Educational Psychologist, 36, 195-209.
(2000), Homework and Achievement: Explaining the Different Strengths of Relation at the Elementary and Secondary School Levels', Social Psychology of Education, 3, 295-317.
(2011), 'Developing Self-Regulation Skills: The Important Role of Homework', Journal of Advanced Academics, 22, 194-218.