Homeric nod

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Related to Homeric: Homeric simile, Homeric Hymns, Homeros

Homeric nod

A continuity error in a work of fiction. An allusion to the Greek poet Homer, whose epic poems contain several apparent errors in continuity. Though the film is being heralded by many as the director's masterpiece, there is a Homeric nod towards the end that is undeniably jarring.
See also: nod
References in periodicals archive ?
This Homeric verb is strongly formulaic at line-end, appearing eight times in the Iliad (and a ninth time not at line-end), and a second time at line-end in the Argonautica.
Rabelais, who in the Prologue to Gargantua, slyly calls Homer the "'paragon of all the word-lovers' [paragon de tousphilologues]," whose Tiers Livre situates many of the work's "most pressing hermeneutic dilemmas with this symbolic Homeric ur-author in order to address how best to interpret texts at odds with themselves, and how to grapple with the elasticity of certain interpretive methods" (156).
Just as famous a characteristic of Homeric epic is the simile.
Recognition of a concern with justice on the part of the Homeric gods is attributed (p.
Ecanakkale offers a useful pit stop for the visitor from Istanbul, who can travel by a combination of bus -- a 6- hour journey from Istanbul's Otogar ( enough time to do some catching up on the Homeric epic or to watch the Brad Pitt version on your laptop) -- and a ferry to cross the Dardanelles, allowing you to retrace the paths of Persian king Xerxes and Alexander the Great rushing to take on enemies in times past.
Nevertheless, the thrust of Whitaker's argument is to propose the Iliad as a poetic site in which the concrete and metaphorical range and cultural force of a Southern African language that is in a phase of dynamic development can encounter Homeric concepts and practices and clarify them by relating them to elements of the emerging hybrid language.
Because Homeric epic is traditional poetry (composed in performance and handed down for centuries without the technology of writing), Homeric similes accumulate additional meaning and resonance over time.
Yet, although I find Vlahos's dismissive attitude toward traditional Homeric scholarship unpalatable, his treatment of the epic genre ahistorical, and his final analysis flawed, I readily acknowledge that several of his observations of individual details in the text of the Odyssey are correct.
the irrational, Homeric lying, deluded citizens-- to a group of poets in
The main emphasis remains Athenian and classical and the survey starts with the Homeric legacy.
"The Journey of Odysseus" (presented by Follow Your Fates) is a reprisal of the ancient Homeric Odyssey as a choose-your-own -adventure role playing game in which the reader is faced with the same choices Odysseus faced.
In analyzing and synthesizing this vast amount of material, Professor Ford sensibly divides this study into two sections: an examination of the problems, particularities, and traditions of textual criticism; and the literary reception of Homeric epic in France.
The art of description, or ekphrasis, is studied initially in general, seen in conjunction with such basic Homeric issues as formulaic language and similes, but via discussions on Homeric descriptions of nature and agriculture, the book ends up studying Homeric descriptions of arts and crafts.
First, are the Homeric poems of the Iliad and Odyssey (composed orally in dactylic hexameters around 700 B.C.), along with scattered fragments from a largely contemporaneous but lost ancillary epic cycle.
In military and political history, one event leads to another, says Dormandy, but there is no discernible continuity between the magic potions of the Homeric gods, or even Renaissance surgeons, and the skills of the modern operating theater.