here today and gone tomorrow


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here today, (and) gone tomorrow

Said of something that is short-lived. I can't believe I've already spent the money I got for my birthday. Here today, gone tomorrow!
See also: gone, here, tomorrow

here today and gone tomorrow

Describing an ephemeral phenomenon, a passing fancy, a fad. Originally this expression referred to the relatively brief span of a human life. It was recorded by numerous writers and was included in James Kelly’s Scottish Proverbs of 1721. By the nineteenth century it had become a less serious thought. T. C. Haliburton (Sam Slick) included it in Wise Saws (1843): “I am a bird of passage—here today and gone tomorrow.”
See also: and, gone, here, today, tomorrow