Henry

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(one's) John Henry

slang One's signature. A variant of the more common "one's John Hancock," likely as a means of shortening it in everyday speech. John Hancock was an influential figure in the American Revolution who is now known for his especially large and legible signature on the Declaration of Independence. As soon as you put your John Henry on these papers, you'll be the proud owner of a brand new car! We're going to need your John Henry on this contract to make the deal official.
See also: henry, john

Adam Henry

slang A euphemistic way to call someone an "asshole," playing on that word's use of the letters A and H. Don't pay attention to that guy, he's a real Adam Henry. Whoa, stop yelling at me. Why are you acting like such an Adam Henry today?
See also: Adam, henry

Henry! Henry Aldrich! Coming, Mother!

A phrase used to call someone to attention (and their response to said call). It comes from Henry Aldrich, a mid-20th century radio show. A: "Where is that boy? Henry! Henry Aldrich!" B: "Coming, Mother!"
See also: henry

one's John Henry

 and one's John Hancock
one's signature. Just put your John Henry on this line, and we'll bring your new car around.
See also: henry, john

John Hancock

Also, John Henry. One's signature, as in Just put your John Hancock on the dotted line. This expression alludes to John Hancock's prominent signature on the Declaration of Independence. The variant simply substitutes a common name for "Hancock." [Mid-1800s]
See also: Hancock, john

Adam Henry

n. an AH = asshole, = jerk. Treated as a name. Why don’t you get some smarts, Adam Henry?
See also: Adam, henry

John Hancock

n. one’s signature. (Refers to the signature of John Hancock, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.) Put your John Hancock right here, if you don’t mind.
See also: Hancock, john

John Hancock

One’s signature. John Hancock was the first man to sign the Declaration of Independence and did so in an exceptionally large, clear hand. Indeed, he supposedly remarked, “I guess King George will be able to read that” (July 4, 1776). In the mid-nineteenth century his name was transferred to anyone’s signature.
See also: Hancock, john

Hen-ree! Henry Aldrich! Coming, Mother!

Henry Aldrich was a very popular radio show that ran from 1939 to 1953. The title character was an awkward adolescent who was forever getting into hot water with his girlfriend and his other friends. The show began with Mrs. Aldrich calling, “Hen-ree, Henry Aldrich!” to which he would reply, “Coming, Mother!” The phrase's elements became 1940s catchwords for summoning and responding, respectively.
See also: henry