Henry! Henry Aldrich! Coming, Mother!

(redirected from Henry Aldrich)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Henry! Henry Aldrich! Coming, Mother!

A phrase used to call someone to attention (and their response to said call). It comes from Henry Aldrich, a mid-20th century radio show. A: "Where is that boy? Henry! Henry Aldrich!" B: "Coming, Mother!"
See also: henry
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Hen-ree! Henry Aldrich! Coming, Mother!

Henry Aldrich was a very popular radio show that ran from 1939 to 1953. The title character was an awkward adolescent who was forever getting into hot water with his girlfriend and his other friends. The show began with Mrs. Aldrich calling, “Hen-ree, Henry Aldrich!” to which he would reply, “Coming, Mother!” The phrase's elements became 1940s catchwords for summoning and responding, respectively.
See also: henry
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
A title page, not in Turner's hand, claims that the service is by Henry Aldrich (1648-1710); however, this is not the same Service in F as that in the Christ Church, Oxford library (Ms.
Sure, there are positive camping movies, from Henry Aldrich: Boy Scout in the 1940s to Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown to the sweet Indian Summer.
Queens, N.Y., native began performing around 5, was in New York Kiddie Troupers film shorts, toured as a teen in "Lottery" (a parody of melodramas) and got his big break in the 1930s when director George Abbott cast him in the lead of "Brother Rat's" national tom: He then starred in Abbott's Broadway production of "What a Life," precursor to the radio and film versions of Henry Aldrich, which Bracken played on tour Ironically, he was later cast in the film "Life With Henry"--with Jackie Cooper as Henry Aldrich and Bracken as best friend Dizzy.
In 1690 Alsop proceeded to Christ Church, Oxford, where his erudition and wit soon brought him to the attention of the enlightened Dean Henry Aldrich, who proved instrumental in promoting the youth' s career.
Watermarks, for instance, reveal that pre- Commonwealth fantazias continued to be copied until the end of the century; and between 1662 and 1682 Edward Lowe, Professor of Music at Oxford University, arranged meetings featuring viol consorts with the support of the two divines, Narcissus Marsh and Henry Aldrich: all three reproduced prodigious quantities of consort music.
Until David Pinto and Jonathan Wainwright began to untangle the mesh of source materials, much of the Hattons' musical activity remained well hidden, obscured by the long shadow of Henry Aldrich.(9) Aldrich was one of the most respected academics in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England, and was connected with Christ Church, Oxford, for most of his life, serving as dean from 1689 until his death in 1710.
Bumpus notes that 'Henry Aldrich is facile princeps'.(21)
William Weber has written that 'Christ Church, and its Dean Henry Aldrich, were the focus of the movement of taste for ancient music' and that 'Many of the most learned musicians and amateurs in England passed through his meetings'.(39) Christopher Hogwood likewise speaks of 'the spirit of [musical] inquiry flowing from the Christ Church circle'.(40) Both are probably correct, but it is difficult to name the members of Aldrich's circle given the dearth of hard evidence.
Henry Aldrich. However, some things of Carissimi I had the luck to light upon, which the great man could not procure in Italy, of which this cantata was one.
A heavily ornamented copy of Orlando Gibbons's verse anthem 'Behold thou hast made my days' survives in the handwriting of Henry Aldrich, probably dating from the 1670s or after (Och MS Mus.
The play poked fun at adolescence, exemplified in Henry Aldrich, a character even more popular later on, in radio and film.
Henry Aldrich. Selected Anthems and Motet Recompositions.
1615), and Henry Aldrich (1648-1710) is a valuable addition to the musician's library, and each one contains a splendid introduction.
Jonathan Wainwright has sieved through a large quantity of manuscript and printed music of the seventeenth century and established that much of the Christ Church, Oxford, collection until now thought to have been assembled by Henry Aldrich (1648-1710) was in fact collected by Christopher Hatton III, son of Christopher Hatton II, the patron of Orlando Gibbons.
32 and passim) with "three main figures" as the primary advocates of old polyphony: Henry Aldrich, Thomas Tudway, and Arthur Bedford (p.