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References in classic literature ?
'So that's what would have happened to my bones had I trusted myself to them,' said the youth sadly; and he began to cry bitterly, not because of the treasures, but because of the lovely girl with her swanlike neck and golden hair.
One day, bending over him, her hair (drying from a salt-water swim) flying about him, the one-woman, her two hands holding his head and jowls so that his ribbon of kissing tongue just missed her nose in the empty air, sang to him: "'Don't know what to call him, but he's mighty lak' a rose!'"
The animal was covered with a thick, smooth skin and had no hair at all except at the extreme end of its tail, where there grew exactly three stiff, stubby hairs.
The other was Della's hair. Had the Queen of Sheba lived in the flat across the airshaft, Della would have let her hair hang out the window some day to dry just to depreciate Her Majesty's jewels and gifts.
"Is that Fanny's hair? I remember her promising to give you some.
Among the art-treasures of Europe there are pictures which approach the Hair Trunk--there are two which may be said to equal it, possibly--but there is none that surpasses it.
As I did so I had taken one of the sumptuous strands of her hair into my hand and kissed it too.
"Gilbert, would you like my hair better if it were like Leslie's?" she asked wistfully.
Never in all her life had Marilla seen anything so grotesque as Anne's hair at that moment.
"I declare, it really seems like being a fine young lady, to come home from the party in a carriage and sit in my dressing gown wit a maid to wait on me," said Meg, as Jo bound up her foot with arnica and brushed her hair.
He was wearing a blue swallow-tail coat, shoes and stockings, and was perfumed and his hair pomaded.
"You'd better leave your hair alone," said Dan gruffly.
A MIDDLE-AGED MAN, whose hair had begun to turn gray, courted two women at the same time.
His face was clean shaven and rather pale, and his hair, showing below his hat, was somewhat gray.
When the time came for them to set out, the fairy went into her bed- chamber, and took a little knife, and cut off a lock of her hair, and gave it to the princess, and said, 'Take care of it, dear child; for it is a charm that may be of use to you on the road.' Then they all took a sorrowful leave of the princess; and she put the lock of hair into her bosom, got upon her horse, and set off on her journey to her bridegroom's kingdom.