hail

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give (one) Hail Columbia

To scold someone harshly. "Hail Columbia" is a euphemism for "hell." My mom really gave me Hail Columbia when she saw my report card and found out that I was failing three classes.
See also: Columbia, give, hail

hail (someone) as (something)

To laud or compliment someone for being something. I would definitely hail Jenny as a leader in our department, especially after seeing how she handled that emergency situation.
See also: hail

hail a cab

To cause a taxi driver to stop and give one a ride. (To do so, one stands near the curb facing oncoming traffic and raises one's arm as a taxi approaches.) It's so crowded here that I'm having a hard time hailing a cab. I hailed a cab so I wouldn't have to lug this stuff all the way home.
See also: hail

hail a taxi

To cause a taxi driver to stop and give one a ride. (To do so, one stands near the curb facing oncoming traffic and raises one's arm as a taxi approaches.) I hailed a taxi so I wouldn't have to lug this stuff all the way home.
See also: hail, taxi

hail damage

slang Cellulite (which tends to have a bumpy or dimpled appearance). Is there anything that will get rid of this hail damage on my thighs?
See also: damage, hail

hail down

To fall, or to be thrown or ejected, usually in a violent manner. I'd stay away from the corner house right now—that couple's in some sort of fight, and possessions are hailing down from the second floor.
See also: down, hail

hail from (some place)

To originate from a particular place. I hail from the Midwest. Where are you from?
See also: hail

Hail Mary

In American football, a long forward pass with a low success of being caught, typically thrown in desperation at the end of a half. And he throws a Hail Mary! Ah, it's incomplete. No overtime tonight, folks.
See also: hail, Mary

Hail Mary pass

In American football, a long forward pass with a low success of being caught, typically thrown in desperation at the end of a half. And he throws a Hail Mary pass! Ah, it's incomplete. No overtime tonight, folks.
See also: hail, Mary, pass

Hail Mary play

In American football, a long forward pass with a low success of being caught, typically thrown in desperation at the end of a half. And he throws a Hail Mary play! Ah, it's incomplete. No overtime tonight, folks.
See also: hail, Mary, play

hail-fellow-well-met

Very friendly, often obnoxiously or disingenuously so. I don't think George is as nice as he seems—he just strikes me as hail-fellow-well-met.

risk of (some inclement weather)

A significant chance of some kind of unpleasant weather, such as rain, snow, lightning, etc., occurring. I just heard that there's a risk of rain tomorrow. I hope our football game doesn't get canceled. You should never set off on a hike when there's a risk of lightning.
See also: of, risk

within call

Close enough to clearly hear when someone is calling to or summoning one. I don't mind if you play outside, but stay within call, OK? Be sure you're within call the whole time—it's very easy to get lost in these mountains.
See also: call, within

within hail

Close enough to clearly hear when someone is calling to or summoning one. I don't mind if you play outside, but stay within hail, OK? Be sure you're within hail the whole time—it's very easy to get lost in these mountains.
See also: hail, within

within hailing distance

Close enough to clearly hear when someone is calling to or summoning one. I don't mind if you play outside, but stay within hailing distance, OK? Be sure you're within hailing distance the whole time—it's very easy to get lost in these mountains.
See also: distance, hail, within
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

give someone Hail Columbia

Inf. to scold someone severely. The teacher gave her students Hail Columbia over their poor test scores. If Miss Ellen finds out I broke her window, she'll give me Hail Columbia for sure!
See also: Columbia, give, hail

hail a cab

 and hail a taxi
to signal to a taxi that you want to be picked up. See if you can hail a cab. I don't want to walk home in the rain.
See also: hail

hail from (some place)

to come from some place as one's hometown or birthplace; to originate in some place. He hails from a small town in the Midwest. Where do you hail from?
See also: hail

hail someone as something

to praise someone for being something. The active members hailed him as fraternity brother of the year. Sally was hailed as an effective leader.
See also: hail

hale-fellow-well-met

Fig. friendly to everyone; falsely friendly to everyone. (Usually said of males.) Yes, he's friendly, sort of hale-fellow-well-met. He's not a very sincere person. Hail-fellow-well-met—you know the type. What a pain he is. Good old Mr. Hail-fellow-well-met. What a phony!

within hailing distance

 and within calling distance; within shouting distance
close enough to hear someone call out. When the boat came within hailing distance, I asked if I could borrow some gasoline. We weren't within shouting distance, so I couldn't hear what you said to me.
See also: distance, hail, within
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hail from

Come from, originate from, as in He hails from Oklahoma. This term originally referred to the port from which a ship had sailed. [Mid-1800s]
See also: hail

within call

Also, within hail. Near enough to hear a summons, as in Tommy's allowed to play outside but only within call of his mother, or We told them they could hike ahead of us but to stay within hail. The first term was first recorded in 1668, the variant in 1697.
See also: call, within
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hail-fellow-well-met

showing excessive familiarity.
1979 Steven Levenkron The Best Little Girl in the World Harold was accustomed to hail-fellow-well-met salesmen and deferential secretaries and even irate accountants.
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

hail as

v.
To praise someone for being something: The veterans were hailed as heroes when they marched in the parade.
See also: hail

hail from

v.
To come or originate from some place: My boss hails from Texas. The governor hails from a small rural town.
See also: hail
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hail damage

n. cellulite. Man, look at that hail damage on her hips!
See also: damage, hail
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

within call

Close enough to come if summoned: The nurse is within call if you need him.
See also: call, within
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hail fellow well met

On easy, congenial terms; also, superficial friendliness. This expression, which has a quintessentially Victorian ring, actually dates from the sixteenth century. Presumably it began as a greeting, but by 1550 it was being used figuratively and so appeared in Thomas Becon’s New Catechisme (“They would be ‘hail fellow well met’ with him”).
See also: fellow, hail, met, well

hail Mary pass

A maneuver tried against heavy odds. This term originated in football, where it means a last-ditch attempt to score because time is running out. The name comes from the familiar prayer beginning with “Hail Mary” and alludes to the fact that the passer is, in effect, praying that his throw will succeed. A famous example occurred in 1984, when Boston College quarterback Doug Flutie threw a long pass into Miami’s end zone. It was caught by his roommate, Gerard Phelan, for a touchdown that put Boston into the 1985 Cotton Bowl. The term soon was transferred to other long-shot maneuvers. In the Persian Gulf War of 1991, Allied troops were lined up on Saudi soil, and between them and Kuwait City stood the entire Iraqi force. A French battalion, making a wide arc around both lines, moved some 150 miles behind the Iraqis and mounted a successful attack that in effect ended the war. In the press conference that followed, Allied commander Schwartzkopf called the maneuver “a Hail Mary play.”
See also: hail, Mary, pass
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
During that violence the defendant picked up a wine glass and struck Miss Hailes as she flailed around with it.
While their marriage may not have worked the way they both envisioned, it did not stop Hailes and Audrey from remarrying other people after their divorce.
The friendship between Hailes and Boswell had begun some years previously, through Hailes's professional connection with Boswell's father, the judge Lord Auchinleck.
He was perfectly happy to receive them for his sole use, but when Hailes discovered that he wasn't the only chap she was chatting to, he got on his high horse.
I expect when Mr Hailes reaches pensionable age, he will be the biggest carper of them all - he's got the makings of it now.
Sonia Hailes' injuries obtained from the glassing incident.
The library of Sir David Dalrymple, Lord Hailes, at Newhailes House is regularly associated with an unsubstantiated quote from Samuel Johnson who supposedly described it as 'the most learned drawing-room in Europe'.
Business network director Sarah Green and 25-year-old coach driver Gary Hailes from Newton Aycliffe weren't far behind John with a weight loss of 9lbs each in the last fortnight.
Steve Jones, Sam Rimmer, Tom Gresty and Alex Hailes combined for second spot in the under-17s men''s 4x100m, while Ryan Jones joined Steve Jones, Rimmer, and Hailes to take second place in the medley.
Environmentalist Julia Hailes, who chaired the think tank, said: "The think tank came up with a number of innovative ideas and a strong call to action for government to consider."
The think tank was chaired by leading environmentalist, Julia Hailes and also included Ken Webster, author of Sense and Sustainability.
LIVERPOOL entrepreneurs Victoria Corcoran and Craig Hailes were in VIP company when they were invited to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Prince's Trust.
Jobless tree surgeon Stephen Hailes, 48, could be jailed after admitting sending indecent and offensive images.
In the Sunday Mail of July 9, we wrongly attributed a quote to the family of Elizabeth Campbell, which said they were concerned she had taken a bad batch of cocaine in Wester Hailes, Edinburgh.