greenwash

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greenwash

1. verb To make illegally-obtained money appear to have come from legal channels; to launder money. This isn't a foolproof plan, Jack—eventually, someone is going to catch you greenwashing.
2. noun Activities undertaken by an organization or company so that it appears more environmentally conscious. Is this "recycled content" label legit, or is it just greenwash?
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

greenwash

tv. to launder money; to obliterate the illegal sources of money by moving it through a variety of financial institutions. (Underworld.) It was shown in court that the mayor had been involved in greenwashing some of the bribe money.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Consumers deserve widely accepted standards to distinguish green from greenwashed," said Jeff Glueck, chief marketing officer of Travelocity/Sabre, referring to the formation of the GSTC Partnership.
In a recent survey of 1,000 consumer products, 99% carried greenwashed claims.
While my new house is "greener" than my past apartments, if I saw it listed as a "green property," I'd definitely have to raise my hand with a little "ahem." So, we also asked green home professionals to share their advice on how to make sure you aren't greenwashed, or that you don't fall for the savvy eco-marketing of a home, development or product when it's really anything but.
For example, in the minds of those members of the press who may have been brainwashed into thinking LEED is THE environmental seal of approval, the Sustainable Forestry Initiative is a greenwashed wood certification program because it was created by the American Forestry & Paper Assn.
You can still drink Coca Cola at Eden (although the vending machines have been 'greenwashed' with scenes of nature, rather than the usual brash red and white logo).
I have to spend more time determining whether products are genuinely environmental or just 'greenwashed' as a marketing ploy"