Greeks bearing gifts, beware of/like

(redirected from Greeks bearing gifts)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

beware of Greeks bearing gifts

proverb Be skeptical of a present or kindness from an enemy. The phrase refers to the Trojan horse, a gift to the Trojans from which Greek soldiers emerged and conquered Troy. A: "I can't believe the opposing team made us cupcakes before the big game!" B: "Yeah, I'd beware of Greeks bearing gifts if I were you."
See also: bearing, beware, gift, Greek, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Beware of Greeks bearing gifts.

Prov. Do not trust an opponent who offers to do something nice for you. (A line from the story of the Trojan horse, as told in Vergil's Aeneid.) Jill: I can't believe Melanie brought me cookies today, when we've been fighting for weeks. Jane: Beware of Greeks bearing gifts. She probably has ulterior motives. When the rival company invited all his employees to a Christmas party, Tom's first impulse was to beware of Greeks bearing gifts, but then he upbraided himself for being paranoid.
See also: bearing, beware, gift, Greek, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Greeks bearing gifts, beware of/like

Do not trust enemies who pretend to be friends. The term refers to the treachery of the Greeks during the Trojan Wars, when they entered the city of Troy bearing the “gift” of a large wooden horse that was actually filled with soldiers who then burned down the city.
See also: bearing, beware, Greek, like, of
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Or the old saying, beware of Greeks bearing gifts? Learn from Malaysia's Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, who canceled projects with China to avoid being trapped.
Beware of Greeks bearing gifts,' the priest Laocoon told the people of Troy in Virgil's 'The Aeneid.' His warning was, of course, famously ignored, and the citizens of the once-free city fell to the invading Greek army from across the sea, thanks to the equally famous Trojan Horse ruse.
The adage goes: Beware Greeks bearing gifts. In that case, you'd best be on constant watch because every day here is like a guilty pleasure.
Sadly, the Trojans have never heard the saying 'beware Greeks bearing gifts' (that's because this is the incident that inspired it) and start celebrating the end of the war.
THEY may say, 'Beware of Greeks bearing gifts', but there was nothing but genuine hospitality when the elderly couple living near my island villa sat me down with a generous glass of raki and a smile when I appeared at their door asking for help after locking myself out without my phone.
Sadly, the Trojans have never heard the saying "beware Greeks bearing gifts" (that's because this is the incident that inspired it) and start celebrating the end of the war.
The ideas of liberty and citizenship, the Western calendar, phrases such as "beware of Greeks bearing gifts" and much more came from this one source.
Beware of Greeks bearing gifts. Or borrowing money.
BREAK FROM THE BAD David Moyes had a rare good day when his side beat Greeks bearing gifts by 3-0 (right)
Don't look now but the MILF-Bangsamoro is the modern version of the Trojan Horse of Greek mythology - "beware of Greeks bearing gifts" - to the kingdom of President Noynoy Aquino...
Live football BBC1 & BBC3, 7.45pm BEWARE commentators who say: "Beware Greeks bearing gifts", writes James Milton.
The 6-4 about Czech Republic is such a good price forget that old saying, "Beware Greeks bearing gifts".
Beware Greeks bearing gifts should now read beware of bankers bearing collateral debt obligations.
Should Coleman beware Greeks bearing gifts? Who knows, but another sojourn abroad can only widen Coleman's managerial experience and would leave him well placed the next time that the Wales vacancy comes around.