gospel

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Related to Gospels: Synoptic Gospels, Four Gospels

accept (something) as gospel

To believe that something is absolutely true without any hesitation or reservations. When we're growing up, we accept what our parents tell us as gospel. The beloved professor's opinions on the subject are accepted as gospel by his students.
See also: accept, gospel

take (something) as (the) gospel truth

To believe that something is absolutely true without any hesitation or reservations. When we're growing up, we take what our parents tell us as gospel truth. That's part of why teenagers are so rebellious, because they're just starting to realize their parents' fallibility. The beloved professor's opinions on the author are taken as the gospel truth by his students.
See also: gospel, take, truth

take (something) as gospel

To believe that something is absolutely true without any hesitation or reservations. When we're growing up, we take what our parents tell us as gospel. That's part of why teenagers are so rebellious, because they're just starting to realize their parents' fallibility. The beloved professor's opinions on the author are taken as gospel by his students.
See also: gospel, take

take (something) for (the) gospel truth

To believe that something is absolutely true without any hesitation or reservations. When we're growing up, we take what our parents tell us for gospel truth. That's part of why teenagers are so rebellious, because they're just starting to realize their parents' fallibility. The beloved professor's opinions on the author are taken for the gospel truth by his students.
See also: gospel, take, truth

take (something) for gospel

To believe that something is absolutely true without any hesitation or reservations. When we're growing up, we take what our parents tell us for gospel. That's part of why teenagers are so rebellious, because they're just starting to realize their parents' fallibility. The beloved professor's opinions on the author are taken for gospel by his students.
See also: gospel, take

the gospel truth

The absolute or indisputable truth. I was home all night, and that's the gospel truth—Mom can confirm it.
See also: gospel, truth
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(the) gospel truth

Fig. the undeniable truth. The witness swore he was telling the gospel truth. I told my parents the gospel truth about how the vase broke.
See also: gospel, truth
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gospel truth

Something that is unquestionably true. For example, Every word he uttered was the gospel truth. The word gospel, which comes from the Old English god spel, "good news," has been used to describe something that is thought to be as true as the biblical gospel (that is, undeniably true) since the 13th century. The current idiom originated in the 1600s, when it referred to biblical truths, and has been applied to truth of a more general nature since the late 1800s. Also see take as gospel.
See also: gospel, truth

take as gospel

Also, take for gospel. Believe absolutely, regard as true, as in We took every word of his as gospel, but in fact he was often mistaken. This idiom, first recorded in 1496, uses gospel in the sense of the absolute truth. Also see gospel truth.
See also: gospel, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take something as gospel

or

take something as the gospel truth

If you take something as gospel or take it as the gospel truth, you accept it as being completely true, especially when it is not. You will read a lot of advice in books and magazines but you shouldn't take it all as gospel. Too many people take what he says as gospel. Note: You can also accept something as gospel or accept something as the gospel truth. For some reason, people are willing to accept as gospel these ridiculous claims. Here, their opinions are accepted as the gospel truth. Note: If you say that something is the gospel truth, you mean that it is completely true. When people ask me how old I am, and I say I don't know, they think I'm lying. But it's the gospel truth. Note: In the Christian religion, the gospel is the message and teachings of Jesus Christ. The four books of the Bible which describe His life and teachings are called the Gospels.
See also: gospel, something, take
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

gospel truth

the absolute truth. informal
1998 Mirror Any research that puts down men is accepted as gospel truth these days.
See also: gospel, truth
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take something as/for ˈgospel/ˌgospel ˈtruth

(informal) believe something without questioning it or without any real proof: You can’t always take what she says as gospel — she’s not the most honest person in the world.It would be foolish to take everything in the newspapers for gospel. OPPOSITE: take something with a pinch of salt
Gospel is the life and teaching of Jesus as described in the Bible.
See also: gospel, something, take, truth
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

gospel (truth)

n. the honest truth. You gotta believe me. It’s the gospel truth!
See also: gospel, truth

gospel

verb
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

gospel truth

Something that may safely be believed. This term dates from the Middle Ages, when Christianity was almost universally accepted in Western civilization. Thus Chaucer used “gospel” in numerous places to mean incontrovertible truth. The word “gospel” is actually a corruption of the Old English godspel, meaning “good tidings,” and was used to signify the glad tidings preached by Jesus, the life of Jesus as told in the New Testament (whose first four books are generally referred to as the Gospels), and the religious doctrine set forth there. Thus gospel truth literally means something as true as what is contained in the Gospels, which once were believed to be literally true, and the term has survived universal belief in that faith by a good many years.
See also: gospel, truth
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Keith said: "Now tickets are on sale for the Lindisfarne Gospels Durham exhibition, it's a good time to start planning your trip to the North East.
The master and librarian of Corpus Christi College will bring the gospels to Canterbury Cathedral, which is done whenever a dean or an archbishop is installed in the cathedral, said the dean of Canterbury Cathedral, Robert Willis.-M.S.
The countdown to the exhibition will be officially started today in Durham with a special performance by the newly-formed Lindisfarne Gospels Community Choir, which includes children from the Durham Cathedral Young Singers.
The Cathedral's Canon Chancellor, the Rev Dr Pete Wilcox, said: "Older than the Book of Kells, St Chad Gospels are on display in the Chapter House of Lichfield almost every day of the year - for free."
"Older than the Book of Kells, St Chad Gospels are on display in the Chapter House of Lichfield almost every day of the year - and astonishingly, you don't have to pay to see it and you don't even have to queue."
Section 1 treats standard issues such as the nature of a Gospel, the fourfold collection, the canonical matrix, and the relation of the Gospels to the historical Jesus.
THE PROGRESSION OF THE GOSPELS PRESENT PILATE AS increasingly benign, almost sympathetic to Jesus, but the purpose is not so much to exonerate Rome as to incriminate the temple authorities.
He wonders if this gospel could be "authentic." What does authentic mean?
The 26-page Gospel of Judas, a translation from Greek into the Coptic language of ancient Egypt, represents the thinking of early gnostic Christians, researchers announced April 6 at the National Geographic Society in Washington, D.C.
(San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 1994); Spong, Liberating the Gospels: Reading the Bible with Jewish Eyes (San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 1996); Spong, Why Christianity Must Change or Die: A Bishop Speaks to Believers in Exile (San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 1998), quotes 20, xix; see John Shelby Spong, This Hebrew Lord (New York: Seabury Press, 1974); Spong, Christpower (New York: Hale Publishing, 1975); Spong and Rabbi Jack D.
Pagels paints a picture of the gospels that would surprise many Catholics--including Gibson--who believe that the gospels are eyewitness accounts.
Those authors - just under 50 of them - who consider whole Gospels or the equivalent (60 studies, some of them very substantial, investigate individual pericopes) work almost exclusively within the parameters of 'traditional' New Testament exegesis.
The Five Gospels: The Search for the Authentic Words of Jesus is a book to rejoice in--a remarkable effort to bring the fruits of a century and a half of serious biblical scholarship to a lay reading public.
Nineteen centuries ago, when the Christian gospels were selected and edited, blame had to be assigned for the crucifixion, which to Christians was deicide.
Predicting that religious studies are on the verge of focusing on the Gospels, Bird explores how the Gospels came to be, what kinds of literature they are, and how they relate to Christian discourse about God.