go public

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go public

1. To publicize or reveal something. When do you guys plan to go public with your relationship?
2. To become a publicly traded company (which requires issuing shares of stock for sale). That company stands to make a lot of money from going public.
See also: public

go public

 (with something)
1. to sell to the public shares of a privately owned company. (Securities markets.) The company decided not to go public because the economy was so bad at the time. Well go public at a later time.
2. to reveal something to the public. It's too early to go public with the story. Just let me know when we can go public with this press release.
See also: public

go public

Become a publicly held company, that is, issue ownership shares in the form of stock. For example, As soon as the company grows a little bigger and begins to show a profit, we intend to go public . [Mid-1900s]
See also: public

go public

COMMON
1. If you go public, you make something known to a lot of people, especially through the TV, newspapers, etc. Railtrack and the government went public with their plans for the west coast main line. Several ministers went public to deny the claims.
2. If a company goes public, it stops being privately owned, and people can buy shares in it. On May 14, Rambus, a microchip maker, went public.
See also: public

go public

1 become a public company. 2 reveal details about a previously private concern.
See also: public

go ˈpublic


1 (of a company) sell shares to the public: We’re hoping to go public early next year.
2 make a public statement about a private matter because you think this is the right thing to do: He decided to go public about his drug problem in order to warn other athletes of the dangers.
See also: public

go public

1. in. to sell to the public shares of a privately owned company. (Securities markets.) We’ll go public at a later time.
2. in. to reveal something to the public. (Especially with with, as in the examples.) Just let me know when we can go public with this.
See also: public
References in periodicals archive ?
But this changed thereafter, with presidents going public defensively when interest groups mobilized against the nominee.
A nonmonetary cost is the diversion of management's attention to going public and dealing with compliance matters.
Standard & Poor's will address the rating issues of going public in Israel and abroad and PwC will discuss M&A deals.
We typically find that from the point management starts mulling over a stock issue, a company needs to set aside one to two years to get its house in order and really prepare for going public," says David Sylvester, a senior partner at the Washington, D.
A third and critical question is whether the stakeholders' interests will be served by going public.
The survey also found managers considered going public when their companies reached a certain critical mass.
Jim Cassidy, the president of Tiber Creek, is an experienced securities lawyer helping companies with going public, Regulation D, private placement memorandums and registration statements with the SEC Securities and Exchange Commission.
Ray Link had had no experience with either employee stock ownership plans or IPOs before he became vice president of finance and CFO of Sawtek in 1995, when the company was on the verge of going public with an ESOP as the dominant shareholder.
Going public would mark the end of an era for the secretive, 130-year-old investment bank.
The first is something every CEO of a publicly traded company knows: Going public is not a destination, but a potentially lucrative, often dangerous journey--and the first step, the IPO, is often a doozy.
An upsurge of banks going public will spread across city commercial banks in 2007 after state-owned banks and joint-stock commercial banks have been successfully listed.
Film Roman, supplier of the animation for ``The Simpsons'' and ``King of the Hill,'' has been getting mugged on Wall Street, two years after going public.
All three panelists say that the number one reason for going public is access to the capital markets.
CHICAGO -- While last year not one bank expressed interest in going public in the next 3 years, this year 12% of private banks and 14% of banks that have mutual charters (mutuals) said they were "very" or "somewhat" likely to take their bank public in the next three years, according to Grant Thornton's 14th Annual Survey of Bank Executives.
But a privately-held company can make the change before going public, thus polishing up earnings for its prospectus, said co-author Teoh.