go public

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go public

1. To publicize or reveal something. When do you guys plan to go public with your relationship?
2. To become a publicly traded company (which requires issuing shares of stock for sale). That company stands to make a lot of money from going public.
See also: go, public
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go public

 (with something)
1. to sell to the public shares of a privately owned company. (Securities markets.) The company decided not to go public because the economy was so bad at the time. Well go public at a later time.
2. to reveal something to the public. It's too early to go public with the story. Just let me know when we can go public with this press release.
See also: go, public
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

go public

Become a publicly held company, that is, issue ownership shares in the form of stock. For example, As soon as the company grows a little bigger and begins to show a profit, we intend to go public . [Mid-1900s]
See also: go, public
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

go public

COMMON
1. If you go public, you make something known to a lot of people, especially through the TV, newspapers, etc. Railtrack and the government went public with their plans for the west coast main line. Several ministers went public to deny the claims.
2. If a company goes public, it stops being privately owned, and people can buy shares in it. On May 14, Rambus, a microchip maker, went public.
See also: go, public
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

go public

1 become a public company. 2 reveal details about a previously private concern.
See also: go, public
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

go ˈpublic


1 (of a company) sell shares to the public: We’re hoping to go public early next year.
2 make a public statement about a private matter because you think this is the right thing to do: He decided to go public about his drug problem in order to warn other athletes of the dangers.
See also: go, public
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

go public

1. in. to sell to the public shares of a privately owned company. (Securities markets.) We’ll go public at a later time.
2. in. to reveal something to the public. (Especially with with, as in the examples.) Just let me know when we can go public with this.
See also: go, public
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Under a number of international regulations, a company must have an operating history of at least three years before being able to go public as going public must be a reward to the founders of the business that would like to cash out," said Boustany.
Going public creates a liquidity event for ownership and the ability to raise capital for management." If you are a business that needs capital and can't borrow it, selling equity is one way to do it," Nelson said.
In this article, we explore opinion contest theory and contrast it with political capital theory, using new data on going public and new data on interest group mobilization against the president.
Perhaps the most radical break is that family businesses are going public. This has helped them gain a larger market share, and expand regionally and even globally.
At the time of going public, an offering memorandum must provide full disclosure of all the information relevant to potential investors assessing the company.
For a private company, there are several benefits to going public, such as access to additional capital, using company stock as currency for acquisitions, owner liquidity, public awareness of the business, potential for further appreciation of the business, and equity compensation for employees.
1 reason for going public is that it can be a good source for less expensive capital to quickly grow a company.
To that end, we help you avoid wasting time and money For 99.9% of us, "going public" is all dream and no reality Here's why
'Going Public 2' gives people a chance to see the incredibly inspired projects being proposed and created in their neighborhoods that will become a part of their everyday lives and shape their communities."
Tiede observes in his second essay that evangelism today is not about guarding Lutheran boundaries of doctrinal purity, but about going public from the center: Christ crucified and raised.
Since going public, conversations at work have showed no indications that those attitudes of empathy have changed.
Far from increasing the efficiency of capital markets, it will discourage some businesses from going public, since most of its provisions do not apply to privately held companies; will encourage some now-public companies to go private; and will keep some foreign companies out of the U.S.
"Going public," explains Salt Lake attorney Brent Christensen of Parsons Behle & Latimer, "is generally accomplished through an initial public stock offering that is filed with the securities division of the state the stock is offered in, and/or with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
"Sarbanes-0xley has never been a consideration in our timing on going public," says Mitch Hecht, vice president of external affairs at ISG.
American Lawyer Media (New York) has released Going Public in Good Times and Bad: A Legal and Business Guide (Nov., '02) for attorneys, entrepreneurs taking their companies public and their advisors.