go overboard

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go overboard

1. Literally, to fall off of a boat. Be careful standing so close to the edge—we don't want anyone to go overboard!
2. To act without restraint in some area. Did I go overboard with the Christmas decorations? I'm worried I bought enough Christmas lights to light up Times Square.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

 
1. Fig. to fall out of a boat or off of a ship; to fall overboard. Be careful or you will go overboard. Someone went overboard in the fog.
2. Fig. to do too much; to be extravagant. Look, Sally, let's have a nice party, but don't go overboard. It doesn't need to be fancy. Okay, you can buy a big comfortable car, but don't go overboard on price.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

Show excessive enthusiasm, act in an excessive way. For example, It's easy to go overboard with a new stock offering, or She really went overboard, hiring the most expensive caterer. [Mid-1900s]
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

1 be highly enthusiastic. 2 behave immoderately; go too far.
The idea behind this idiom is that of recklessly jumping over the side of a ship into the water.
See also: go, overboard

go ˈoverboard (about/for somebody/something)

(informal) be too excited or enthusiastic about something or about doing something: I told her just to cook a simple meal but she went completely overboard.He doesn’t just like her. He’s gone completely overboard about her.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

in. to do far more than is necessary. Now don’t go overboard for us. We’re just folks.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

To go to extremes, especially as a result of enthusiasm.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard, to

To go to extremes; to overreact, especially in favor of something or someone. This expression, which conjures up the extreme act of jumping or falling off a ship, dates from the first half of the twentieth century. For a time it signified living beyond one’s means, but that meaning is no longer current. John P. Marquand used the term in its contemporary sense (Melville Goodwin, 1951): “Did you ever hear about General Goodwin going overboard over an American girl in Paris?”
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References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "Police were contacted this morning at approximately 7am in relation to a report of a person going overboard from the Oceana shortly before docking at Southampton.
IF there was any sense of fans going overboard about the arrival of Jurgen Klopp, it was swiftly dashed against Rubin Kazan.
Apparently realising that the media is going overboard to project Y S Jaganmohan Reddy, son of late Y S Rajasekhara Reddy, as the next Chief Minister, Rosaiah has decided to keep the media in good humour and gain its confidence.
Punters were going overboard about Frankie Dettori's mount, Soldier's Tale, all day, especially in-running (his previous mount, Khun John, traded at crazy prices, and for serious money, despite never really ever looking like the long odds-on shot some made him), and Soldier's Tale was no exception.
Coleen, 20, confessed she felt bloated after going overboard on steaks, pizzas and spuds while she and Wayne sunned themselves in St Tropez after the World Cup.
In his speech to Ulster convention at the weekend Greenan also accused the media of "going overboard" in the aftermath of the Dublin v Tyrone saga.
He said: "I won't be going overboard but I'd like to bring in a few because we've been rather thin on the ground."
Unfortunately, dancers often get into trouble by going overboard. I know of one 15-year-old ballet student who believed that she had to cut out all junk food.
HUGH Grant really seems to be going overboard for Jemima Khan during their sunshine break in Barbados.
Some fans and pundits had been going overboard about this new-look team and were brought down to earth.
But the female staff haven't exactly been going overboard about Walker's hunky charms.
WITHOUT going overboard, the form of Li Tie has been a pleasant surprise.