Godwin's law

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Godwin's law

A maxim stating that the longer an online debate continues, the higher the likelihood that a comparison will be made to Adolf Hitler or the Nazis. The concept is credited to American lawyer and author Mike Godwin. Someone in this thread will be compared to Hitler soon enough—it's just Godwin's law.
See also: law
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
After Jonathan's return to Ireland his uncle, Godwin Swift, seems to have taken charge of him, and when he was six to have sent him to a good school.
She was thinking of her evening dresses for the visit to Sir Godwin Lydgate's, which she had long been secretly hoping for as a delightful employment of at least one quarter of the honeymoon, even if she deferred her introduction to the uncle who was a doctor of divinity (also a pleasing though sober kind of rank, when sustained by blood).
"I hope your uncle Sir Godwin will not look down on Rosy, Mr.
Edward the Confessor had a palace here, and here the great Earl Godwin was proved guilty by the justice of that age of having encompassed the death of the King's brother.
"Yes, pretty well; but Godwin insists on my keeping it up constantly for some time to come.
The 40-year-old Godwins Furniture and Bed Centre was demolished after the fire ripped through the Norton Road store in April 2013.
In one devastating scene, the Godwins' trusted housekeeper, Mavis, shows up at their house on Harare's outskirts with a carload of government-backed goons who accuse the Godwins of having underpaid her for years--an accusation clearly without foundation--and demand that they make restitution.
Within two to five days of delivery, the Godwins said, a Whisper Creek Home could be in the dry.
exercised remarkable understatement when she described Godwins political
The King now turned the tables on Godwin by calling out the militia of all England, which meant that even in the Godwins' own earldoms many men were duty bound to join a force opposing them.
Clair, The Godwins and the Shelleys (London: Faber and Faber, 1989) 225-30.
It added to the measure of my distraction." In his Memoirs of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1798), this is William Godwin's description of his feelings shortly after questioning the nurse just coming out of the room where his wife, Mary Wollstonecraft, lay dying.
Francis Godwin (1562-1633), bishop successively of Llandaff and Hereford, wrote what was later regarded as the first piece of English science-fiction, The Man in the Moone, published posthumously in 1638.
Despite a recent resurgence of interest in his life and in certain of his works, William Godwin remains an elusive and little-noticed figure of English literary and intellectual history.
From one point of view, therefore, it should seem strange (and eventually did seem strange) that William Godwin, long a partisan of parliamentary reform, would not seek it through the democratic venue of public speaking, or at least approve of others' doing so.