Godwin's law


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Godwin's law

A maxim stating that the longer an online debate continues, the higher the likelihood that a comparison will be made to Adolf Hitler or the Nazis. The concept is credited to American lawyer and author Mike Godwin. Someone in this thread will be compared to Hitler soon enough—it's just Godwin's law.
See also: law
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Godwin's law states that as an online argument goes on the probability of a protagonist being compared to Hitler increases, and as soon as that happens the argument is forfeited.
The real life version of Godwin's law was confirmed so long ago in this election cycle that it might as well have included a Godse corollary.
Long threads of 300+ comments might have appeared below the link on someone's "Timeline" turning into arguments which may have utilized "Godwin's Law" or the "Dunning Kruger Effect" in place of a formal debate about the work--a common scenario on social media.
I am reminded of Godwin's Law: "As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches one."
I searched in vain for an example of Godwin's Law, but no one had used the phrase Food Nazi, or at least not yet.
Coun Mullaney may not be aware of a tradition among internet-users known as Godwin's Law - the first person to mention the Nazis in an argument is automatically deemed to have lost it.
One of my favorites is "Godwin's Law"--"The longer an argument drags on, the likelier someone will stoop to a Hitler or Nazi analogy." How about this, from your wife, after a long argument about you taking so much time fussing with your reloading gear: "You're such a Nazi when it comes to keeping your reloading stuff labeled." Which also crosses into Benford's Law, if you ask me.
A corollary to Godwin's Law is the well-known tradition in the Internet's Usenet newsgroups that once a person in a discussion thread invokes the comparison to Hitler or the Nazis, the thread is ended and the person who made the comparison has automatically lost whatever argument was in progress.
Jokers will appreciate such entries as HTCPCP, a joke format dreamt up as an April Fools Day joke, while historians will appreciate learning about Godwin's Law. There are the inevitable high-tech definitions as well plus loads of words that the novice net-user will get a lot of help from so everyone can glean something of use from it.
But those familiar with Godwin's Law ("as an on-line discussion grows larger, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches one") might rather see this laughable exchange more as a product of Internet anthropology than of Afghan anthropology Again, Edwards's argument is neither profound nor explicit enough to be conclusively proven.
Increasingly, in a modern twist on Godwin's Law, each side is comparing the other to Daesh (ISIS).
A troll isn't a catchall term that applies to anyone who disagrees with you, the twitter version of Godwin's Law (" As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches 1").