God-given right

God-given right

A special privilege or authority bestowed upon someone by a higher power. Many feel that the law prohibits something that is their God-given right.
See also: right
References in classic literature ?
You've been ringing the changes too long on the God-given right to work .
MICKEY HARTE has backed Sky's coverage of gaelic games and says armchair GAA fans have no "God-given right" to see every big game on free-to-air TV.
Pontypool do not have a God-given right to be in the Premiership and it is an insult to those 12 teams to suggest that they do.
Every life is important every Filipino has a God-given right to safety," the vice president said.
THE Feedback article, 'We must cherish the free press',(04.05.18) for justice, legitimacy and selfdetermination throughout the planet, every human has the basic God-given right to be heard.
'The hunger and desire is still there but no one has a God-given right to play for England,' he said.
Having a child is not a God-given right and it is not the end of the world if you can't conceive.
I would be interested to know if these figures are a reflection of the numbers of cyclists who seem to think they have the God-given right to ride on the pavements!
And now, one Jew has decided that he'd like to spend his Shabbat working, because it's his God-given right. Or, at the very least, his court-ordered right.
"There are interest groups and individual MPs in this party who think it's their God-given right to rule.
Brown for refreshing my memory ("Gun ownership a God-given right," June 13).
"We've no God-given right to win the Europa League.
PHIL JONES has warned his Man United team-mates against complacency - insisting they've "no God-given right" to win tomorrow night's Europa League Final against Ajax.
FOLLOWING the extraordinary council meeting called by the council's Labour Leader George Duggins (CT Article, August 4), with the primary purpose of demanding Coun Williams resign in order to facilitate a by-election in a ward where Labour believe they have a God-given right to rule, could I suggest to Coun Duggins that his statement, "there is nothing legally or constitutionally to make Coun Williams resign, but morally he is compelled to" could have been applied with equal vigour to his own position as Head of Child Services during the horrific and far more disturbing case surrounding the death of little Daniel Pelka.
The great 19th-century French statesman and political philosopher Frederic Bastiat, in his brief yet magisterial treatise The Law, observed that laws and government are merely the collectivization of the natural, God-given right to self-defense: