(as) round as Giotto's O

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Related to Giotto: Giotto di Bondone, Masaccio

(as) round as Giotto's O

Quickly yet perfectly done. The phrase refers to the Italian artist Giotto, who is said to have promptly drawn a perfect circle to demonstrate his artistic abilities for Pope Boniface VIII. Wow, I can't believe you wrote this paper in one night—your writing is round as Giotto's O.
See also: round
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But for the most part, I believe, this art would have been perceived, before Picasso, perhaps as Giotto would have been perceived by the artists of Vasari's time as good for his backward time but essentially as "primitive" (as the artists of Siena are sun explicitly designated).
Jacobus demonstrates that Giotto almost certainly planned both the layout of the frescoes and the architecture so that each entrance framed views of significant images.
Image: Giotto di Bondone, Saint Francis of Assisi Receiving the Stigmata, ca.
Known simply as Giotto this Florentine painter of the late thirteenth century made a major contribution to the art world.
Presented for the first time at the INDEX08 show, Giotto technology introduces a few special features.
If Giotto has transported you up to heaven, this house will bring you back to earth.
Andrew Ladis's "The Sorcerer's 'O' and the Painter Who Wasn't There" compares the Lives of Giotto and Buffalmacco as hero and anti-hero.
Visit the city of Michaelangelo, Da Vinci, Giotto, Dante, and the Medici family
If anything, his painting manifested the vitality and assimilative possibilities of a Tuscan tradition extending back to Giotto and the Lorenzetti brothers.
Drawings for the original basilica built by Emperor Constantine come next, followed by its treasures, a Bust of an Angel, a mosaic by Giotto, and the Mandylion of Edessa, a 5th-century linen painting of Our Lord surrounded by an elaborate gold and silver frame.
In 1937 the exhibition on the age of Giotto at the Uffizi showed in its first room a small group of works by thirteenth-century Pisan artists.
The editors of this volume provide the perfect introduction (1-9) to a number of articles which complement one another and present a very comprehensive view of Giotto as one of the most important masters of early Italian art.
Beginning in the Middle Ages with Giotto and moving through the Renaissance, Mannerism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and the Avant-Garde, each artist selected is given in-depth attention with six pages of text complemented by full-color reproductions of their most significant works.
Giotto Perspectives, however, is all about the new services--the technology and the business development.