Gen Xer

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Gen Xer

A nickname for a member of Generation X, the generation of people born roughly between 1965 and 1980, between baby boomers and millennials. The name comes from the title of Douglas Coupland's 1991 novel Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture. Commonly abbreviated as "Gen Xer." I know it's hard for you to believe, but Gen Xers like me grew up without the Internet.
See also: Gen, Xer
References in periodicals archive ?
Both generations regularly buy via multi-channel experiences, with 82 percent of Gen Xers and boomers surveyed buying in-store at least monthly, and 46 percent of Gen Xers and 40 percent of boomers surveyed shopping online at least monthly.
While millennials seem to be the generation most interested in applying their ideals on environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues to their finances, Gen Xers and baby boomers are also expressing growing interest, according to the ESG Investor Sentiment Study from Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America (Allianz Life).
Millennials are more likely to make investment decisions based on issues that are important to them (64% compared with 54% of Gen Xers and 42% of boomers)
One in six Gen Xers purchased a multi-generational home, overtaking younger boomers as the generation most likely to do so; with 52 percent of those Gen X buyers indicating that they did so because their adult children have either moved back or never left home.
Think about it for a second: When this event was first held in 1995, the honorees were likely mostly Baby Boomers, along with some Gen Xers. The 2019 class will probably be mostly comprised of millennials and a few Gen Xers.
Gen Xers between the ages of 38 and 45, for example, use Twitter 11% more than the average consumer, while 46- to 53-year-old Xers are smack dab on the average for Twitter usage.
Gen Xers, currently 39 to 54, initiated the era of the two-income family and rising divorce rates, and latchkey kids became more independent.
Boomers rely primarily on pensions and 401(k) plans, while Gen Xers look to 401(k)s and individual retirement accounts (IRAs).
consumers, 45% of millennials, 35% of Gen Xers, 27% of boomers, and 14% of seniors-say buying online allows them to find lower-priced beauty and personal care product options.
The oldest Americans are fading in all measurements but homeownership, which registered an increase from all groups but the Gen Xers.
Gen Xers ages 35 to 44 were the largest group to report that they do not keep obstacle to saving.
Older Gen Zers are beginning college, millennials are starting families, Gen Xers are becoming empty nesters and more baby boomers are retiring each day.
However, the financial wellness and retirement preparedness of these gig workers are far from assured--particularly for Gen Xers, according to a new research paper from Prudential Financial, Inc.
Eighty-eight percent of millennial respondents also agreed that social media reinforced a tendency to compare one's wealth/lifestyle with that of others, compared with 71% of Gen Xers and 54% of boomers who believed this.
In fact, in 2017, 74% of millennials did not pay their medical bills in full, compared to 68% of Gen Xers and 60% of baby boomers.