gate

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a creaking gate hangs longest

proverb Sick people often outlive healthy people. Oh, I wouldn't worry about Uncle Stu—he's been sick for years, and a creaking gate hangs longest.
See also: creak, gate, hang, long

be given the gate

To be dismissed or spurned. I'm trying to sell these vacuums door to door, and I've been given the gate left and right!
See also: gate, given

crash the gate

To attend an event, such as a concert, sports match, or party, without being invited or paying to get in. That's way too much money to see them in concert, let's just crash the gate and see them on the sly! There's always a few who crash the gate at my party and end up causing trouble.
See also: crash, gate

gatecrasher

One who attends an event, such as a concert, sports match, or party, without being invited or paying to get in. I don't mind gatecrashers coming to my parties, so long as they behave themselves. Due to the popularity of the show—and the limited amount of tickets—extra security was hired to keep any gatecrashers out of the concert.

get the gate

To be dismissed or spurned. I'm trying to sell these vacuums door to door, and I'm getting the gate left and right!
See also: gate, get

give (someone) the gate

Primarily heard in UK.
1. To be fired from one's job. After messing up that account, I'm terrified that my boss is going to give me the gate.
2. To have a romantic relationship ended by one's partner. Susan is just devastated—Kelly gave her the gate a few days ago.
See also: gate, give

like a bull at a gate

Very quickly and rashly; hastily, without careful thinking or planning. I only have a few hours before this essay is due, so I'm going at it like a bull at a gate. With only a few seconds left in the match, he started charging at his opponent like a bull at a gate out of desperation.
See also: bull, gate, like

out (of) the (starting) gate

At or from the very starting position. Out the gate, the company's latest video game console has proven wildly popular. We're aiming to be the first one out of the gate with mixed-reality technology. I was a bit slow out of the starting gate to find what I wanted to study in college, but by my second year I felt really confident in my degree.
See also: gate, out

the gate

A rejection, dismissal, or refusal. Usually used after "get" or "give." I got the gate from the firm after I lost the Jefferson account. I thought our first few dates went really well, but she gave me the gate last night out of nowhere.
See also: gate

the pearly gates

The gates of heaven. The phrase originates from a passage about heaven in the book of Revelation. Sometimes capitalized. When I get to the pearly gates, I want Saint Peter to say, "Now the party can begin!"
See also: gate, pearly
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

creaking door hangs longest

 and creaking gate hangs longest
Prov. Sickly people often live longer than healthy ones. Jill: I'm worried that my grandmother may not live much longer. She's been sick for so many years. Jane: Well, if it's any comfort, I've heard that a creaking door hangs longest.
See also: creak, door, hang, long

get the gate

Inf. to be sent away; to be rejected. I thought he liked me, but I got the gate. I was afraid I'd get the gate, and I was right.
See also: gate, get

give someone the gate

Sl. to get rid of someone. The chick was a pest, so I gave her the gate. He threatened to give me the gate, so I left.
See also: gate, give
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crash the gate

Gain admittance, as to a party or concert, without being invited or without paying. For example, The concert was outdoors, but heavy security prevented anyone from crashing the gate. This term originally applied to persons getting through the gate at sports events without buying tickets. By the 1920s it was extended to being an uninvited guest at other gatherings and had given rise to the noun gatecrasher for one who did so. [Early 1900s]
See also: crash, gate

give someone the air

Also, give someone the brush off or the gate or the old heave-ho . Break off relations with someone, oust someone, snub or jilt someone, especially a lover. For example, John was really upset when Mary gave him the air, or His old friends gave him the brush off, or Mary cried and cried when he gave her the gate, or The company gave him the old heave-ho after only a month. In the first expression, which dates from about 1920, giving air presumably alludes to being blown out. The second, from the first half of the 1900s, alludes to brushing away dust or lint. The third, from about 1900, uses gate in the sense of "an exit." The fourth alludes to the act of heaving a person out, and is sometimes used to mean "to fire someone from a job" (see get the ax). All these are colloquialisms, and all have variations using get, get the air (etc.), meaning "to be snubbed or told to leave," as in After he got the brush off, he didn't know what to do.
See also: air, give, someone
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

get the gate

AMERICAN
If someone gets the gate, they are sent away or told that they are not wanted. He was replaced for a time by the respected Emanuel Steward, who also eventually got the gate. Note: You can also say that someone is given the gate. Both competitors were given the gate for breaking the rules.
See also: gate, get
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

like a bull at a gate

hastily and without thought.
See also: bull, gate, like

get (or be given) the gate

be dismissed from a job. North American informal
See also: gate, get
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the ˌPearly ˈGates

(humorous) the gates of heaven: What’s going to happen when I get to those Pearly Gates? Have I lead a good life?
See also: Gate, pearly
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the gate

n. a forced exit; sending (someone) away. (see also give someone the gate.) I could see in his eyes that it was the gate for me.
See also: gate

give someone the gate

tv. to get rid of someone. The chick was a pest, so I gave her the gate.
See also: gate, give, someone
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

get the gate

Slang
To be dismissed or rejected.
See also: gate, get

give (someone) the gate

Slang
1. To discharge from a job.
2. To reject or jilt.
See also: gate, give
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
"If I may make so bold, I would not try to enter the city from this gate, as 'tis closely guarded since yesterday.
"My thanks, gentle palmer," quoth Robin, "your suggestion is good, and we will deploy to the gate upon the far side."
As it were to make up for his fault, he hastened to open the gate, which swung creaking on its hinges.
Not even a single guard was visible before the great entrance gate, nor in the gardens beyond, into which he could see, was there sign of the myriad life that pulses within the precincts of the royal estates of the red jeddaks.
In the few seconds that had been required for the consummation of these rapidly ensuing events, Otobu had dragged Bertha Kircher to the gate which he had unbarred and thrown open, and with the vanquishing of the last of the active guardsmen, the party passed out of the maniac city of Xuja into the outer darkness beyond.
From the open gate of the city of maniacs came the answering cry of a lion.
De Vac turned their steps toward the little postern gate, but when he would have passed through with the tiny Prince the latter rebelled.
De Vac clapped his hand over the child's mouth to still his cries, but it was too late, the Lady Maud and her lover had heard, and in an instant they were rushing toward the postern gate, the officer drawing his sword as he ran.
Larsan turned his head at the sound of a vehicle which had come from the chateau and reached the gate behind him.
The cab was already at the park gate and Robert Darzac was begging Frederic Larsan to open it for him, explaining that he was pressed for time to catch the next train leaving Epinay for Paris.
In another moment the gate would be opened and the head of the column pass out upon the death-bordered highway.
Peter asked her the way to the gate, but she had such a large pea in her mouth that she could not answer.
"Thank ye," said John, "I think you are quite in the right place, and maybe a little scratching will teach you not to leap a pony over a gate that is too high for him," and so with that John rode off.
Ranging her mare alongside, she bent, slid the catch, and followed the opening gate.
Tellson's Bank, established in the Saint Germain Quarter of Paris, was in a wing of a large house, approached by a courtyard and shut off from the street by a high wall and a strong gate. The house belonged to a great nobleman who had lived in it until he made a flight from the troubles, in his own cook's dress, and got across the borders.