gangsta

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gangsta

1. noun, colloquial African-American slang Someone who is an active member of a criminal gang or engages in a lifestyle characterized by criminal activities; a gangster. Mom's worried you're gonna become a gangsta and end up dead.
2. noun, slang By extension, one who is tough or aggressive or exhibits such a persona. That guy's a real gangsta—I'm a little intimidated by him, honestly.
3. adjective, slang Tough and aggressive and exhibiting bold action. The term usually implies approval of such action. A: "I can't believe I just demanded all that money from him!" B: "I know, that was so gangsta, dude!"
4. adjective Describing a style of rap music characterized by lyrics and themes concerning the struggle of urban life, gang membership, violence, and sexual exploits. Ice-T is considered a forefather of gangsta rap.

gangsta rap

A style of rap music characterized by lyrics and themes concerning the struggle of urban life, gang membership, violence, and sexual exploits. Ice-T is considered a forefather of gangsta rap.
See also: gangsta, rap

baby gangsta

slang A gangster who is deemed by others to be insignificant or illegitimate. Ignore him, he's just a baby gangsta, new on the scene.
See also: baby, gangsta

baby gangsta

and BG
n. a baby gangster; a fake gangster. (Streets.) He’s just a baby gangsta. Got a lot of growing to do. Little “BGs” grow up to be real ones.
See also: baby, gangsta
References in periodicals archive ?
The rap debate in the public media entirely misses such evolved and highly competitive aspects of the genre and instead simply focuses on whether gangsta lyrics represent reality or shape reality--in other words, induce criminal behavior.
That is why, incongruous as it often seems, gangsta rap has come to provide the most articulate frame for black anger available to its young devotees.
The gangsta MC needs the ghetto to justify his every move and rhyme; without that constant appeal, he falls off, his career is over, he becomes a tired studio gangsta.
Like barometric pressure systems, separate but equal, in a prevailing weather front, the gangsta and the diva are ruling rival forces in black popular culture.
The following remark by Lawrence Levine discusses nineteenth century attitudes but is relevant to contemporary gangsta rap artists:
For young gangsta rappers, however, even this short-lived feeling of dominance has appeal; and so, they covet the opportunity to obtain voice and power, the abstract `merits' of tricksters and Badmen.
Attempts to secure the American dream, with limited means, result in the glorification of will to power that necessitates the gangsta's demise (a surrender, in Camus's terms, to absurdity).
I often drift when I drive, havin' fatal thoughts of suicide....(28) The careful listener and observer will notice that although some songs by gangsta rappers glory in cruel exploits, they also acknowledge and lament this destruction.
Whereas gangsta rap represents the ideology of the Badmen, progressive rap loosely represents a late twentieth-century incarnation of the Jeremiad tradition, with hints of the griot.
Drawing on the examples of trickster and badmen figures, gangsta rap creates meaning through the violent and often self-destructive manipulation of structures and persons.
An early version of some of my thoughts on gangsta rap are expressed in my article "Gettin' Grown: Notes on Gangsta Rap Music and Notions of Manhood," in The journal of African American men.
(11.) I readily acknowledge that lyrical elements and attitudes identified as "gangsta" are first present in Schooly D (1987) and the early work of KRS-One and Scott La Rock (1987) on the East Coast and Ice-T (1987) on the West Coast.