GI can

GI can

1. A large trash receptacle made from galvanized iron (GI) used by the military during World War I. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Our uniforms became so infested with lice after living in the trenches that we were all ordered to dump them into the GI cans at the edge of the encampment.
2. World War I military slang for a large German artillery shell. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. The first time you hear the blast it scares you half to death, but before long, the sound of GI cans dropping around you becomes part of the daily routine.
See also: can
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, the American Diabetes Association recommends that the GI can provide glucose control benefits in addition to watching the amount of carbs you eat.
The GI can be misleading because certain fruits (such as watermelon) and vegetables (such as carrots) may have high GI values but low amounts of carbohydrates and calories.
But as the food industry attempts to gauge the future of GI-based foods, perhaps it is most important to figure out how GI can play a long-term role in changing consumer eating patterns in order to avoid meeting the same fate as low-carb foods.
"While I understand GI is trying to give people a measure, I also believe GI can steer consumers toward following a diet regimen that only focuses on GI and not on the quality of the ingredients in the product," Merriken says.
'Picking foods with a lower GI can help you feel full for longer - low GI foods are quite often healthy choices, although portion size plays a part.' People with diabetes have been adhering to its principles to help control their blood sugar levels for years.
As an adjunct to a comprehensive nutrition plan, learning about the GI can give patients a better understanding of insulin and glucose release and how this interaction affects weight and overall health.