fringe benefit

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fringe benefit

A non-monetary perk, incentive, or benefit for working a job that is given in addition to one's normal wage or salary. One of the fringe benefits of working here is getting free lunch in the cafeteria.
See also: benefit, fringe
References in periodicals archive ?
s] = Ratio of value-added by commodity producing sectors to value-added by services sectors; FB = Fringe benefits.
Contractors and subcontractors performing on covered service contracts must pay their service workers no less than the wages and fringe benefits prevailing in the locality, or rates contained in a predecessor contractors collective bargaining agreement.
8226; Review Tax rules on fringe benefits and to determine the correct taxation amount of those benefits
Fortunately for employers and employees, a number of fringe benefits are fully or partially excluded from an employee's income, yet still deductible by the employer as a business expense.
In general, the nondiscrimination rules do not apply to de minimis fringe benefits.
One of the most common forms of fringe benefit has traditionally been the provision of a motor vehicle for the private use of an employee.
As a general matter, any fringe benefit that a business provides is taxable and must be included in the recipient's pay unless the law specifically excludes it.
If these fringe benefits are however, correctly spent on what they are intended for, as for example a housing allowance, then a pensioner should not have a home loan debt at retirement that needs to be paid for out of a pension income.
8) The Congressional committee reports on this provision (9) include the following specific fringe benefits (1) the tax exclusion for benefits under a health and accident plan, Section 105; (2) the tax exclusion for coverage under a health and accident plan, Section 106; (3) the tax benefits for group-term life insurance, Section 79; and (4) the exclusion for meals and lodging furnished for the convenience of the employer, Section 119.
132-6(e)(2) also provides examples of fringe benefits to which the de minimis rules do not apply.
With the enactment of the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984 (DRA 1984), (1) Congress at last addressed the federal income taxation treatment of nonstatutory fringe benefits, (2) an area that had been shaped by administrative pronouncements of the Internal Revenue Service (Service) (3) punctuated by judicial oversight.
These contributions also appear to be taxable fringe benefits subject to section 3402(a) income tax withholding, and wages subject to Social Security and Medicare taxes.
Three areas that need special attention, he says, involve: Section 162(m) of the IRS code, which covers deductions for compensation in excess of $1 million; loans to executives; and fringe benefits.
It addresses the overall challenges to charter schools, the law establishing a charter funding formula, a new program area of the state budget, fringe benefits, and issues needing clarification and resolution.