Frankenstein's monster

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Frankenstein's monster

Something that harms or destroys its creator and cannot be controlled. A reference to the monster in the book Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. At first, my side business seemed like a good idea, but it has turned into Frankenstein's monster, eating away at my time and finances.
See also: monster
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Frankenstein's monster

a thing that becomes terrifying or destructive to its maker.
Frankenstein was the title of a novel written in 1818 by Mary Shelley . The scientist Frankenstein creates and brings to life a manlike monster which eventually turns on him and destroys him; Frankenstein is not the name of the monster itself, as is often assumed.
1991 John Kingdom Local Government & Politics in Britain The factories of the bourgeoisie had created another dangerous by-product, a Frankenstein's monster posing a constant sense of threat—the working class.
See also: monster
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References in periodicals archive ?
Today, Frankenstein is one of the most read novels in history, available in hundreds of editions and translations.
In literature and film, the creature continues to be celebrated through reinventions like the recently published Pride and Prometheus, a mash-up of Shelley's novel with Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, and the recent movies Victor Frankenstein, starring Daniel Radcliffe, and Frankenweenie, a Disney animated film.
Above all, Frankenstein is a parable about scientific discovery and technological innovation.
Bioengineer Kevin Esvelt writes in an article for the website Slate that Frankenstein has much to teach us about scientific creativity and responsibility today.
But Crispr and other medical advances raise a host of concerns, similar to the ones Victor Frankenstein wrestles with in the novel Frankenstein.
Frankenstein begins with a series of six letters sent by Captain Robert Walton, from St.
The stranger, Genevese by birth and called Victor Frankenstein, started his life story.
A few days after his arrival at Ingolstadt, Victor Frankenstein attended Professor Waldman's lecture on old and modern scholars, a lecture which would change, completely and disastrously, his entire life:
(Picard 2003: 6) Discussing the evolution of the Frankenstein myth in literature and film, Caroline Joan S.
Oh, Frankenstein, be not equitable to every other, and trample upon me alone, to whom thy justice, and even thy clemency and affection, is most due.
Some numbers could perhaps benefit from a trim: "Young Frankenstein: The Musical" is nearly three hours long.
Holmes as Frederick Frankenstein and Elizabeth Pawlowski as Inga perform the musical number "A Roll in the Hay" during "The New Mel Brooks Musical Young Frankenstein" at The Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts.
Frankenstein superficially resembles Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794), Matthew Gregory Lewis' The Monk (1796), and Charles Robert Maturin's Melmoth the Wanderer (1820).
Readers familiar with the popular motion picture adaptations of Frankenstein are likely to be surprised when they come upon Mary Shelley's novel.
As an illustration of the humanitarian philosophy of Jean Jacques Rousseau, Frankenstein shows the destructive results of undeveloped affection.