Frankenstein's monster

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Frankenstein's monster

Something that harms or destroys its creator and cannot be controlled. A reference to the monster in the book Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. At first, my side business seemed like a good idea, but it has turned into Frankenstein's monster, eating away at my time and finances.
See also: monster

Frankenstein's monster

a thing that becomes terrifying or destructive to its maker.
Frankenstein was the title of a novel written in 1818 by Mary Shelley . The scientist Frankenstein creates and brings to life a manlike monster which eventually turns on him and destroys him; Frankenstein is not the name of the monster itself, as is often assumed.
1991 John Kingdom Local Government & Politics in Britain The factories of the bourgeoisie had created another dangerous by-product, a Frankenstein's monster posing a constant sense of threat—the working class.
See also: monster
References in periodicals archive ?
There appear innumerable sons, daughters, brides, or spectres; Frankenstein is put face to face to monsters both from space and from the inmost depths of Hell, or is forced to confront werewolves, not to speak anything of Dracula himself.
The novel was first brought to the screen in Frankenstein (1910), a sixteen minutes short produced by Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931), starring Augustus Phillips (1874-1944) as Victor, and Charles Stanton Ogle (1865-1940) as the misshapen Monster, born--in a remarkable pre-animatronic special effects scene--from a cauldron of fiery chemicals (Jones 1994, 15, 17; Jones 1999: 146).
Pierce (1889-1968)--into a feeling of sympathy both for Frankenstein (Henry, not Victor, this time), whose dreams went awry, and for the Monster, so filled with "humanity .
The first, The Curse of Frankenstein (1957)--starring Christopher Lee (1922-) as the Monster, Peter Cushing (1913-1994) as Victor Frankenstein, Hazel Court (1926-2008) as Elizabeth--came closer to Shelley's novel than any other film before, but left much to be desired both because of the extreme "expressionistic color" of blood, a "brilliant, vivid, rich red" which drenched the sets in a "chromatic dispersion of light and shadow" (Miller 1995: 47), and of Lee's make-up, "excessively nasty, as though he had been pickled for a year or two in formaldehyde" (Halliwell 1988: 165).
Critical editions (selected titles): Frankenstein, M.
Hudford Janes, Revenge of Frankenstein, 1958; Benoit Becker [Jean-Claude Carriere], Le Tour de Frankenstein, 1957; Benoit Becker [Jean-Claude Carriere], Le Pas de Frankenstein, 1957; Benoit Becker [Jean-Claude Carriere], La Nuit de Frankenstein, 1957; Benoit Becker [Jean-Claude Carriere], Le Sceau de Frankenstein, 1957; Benoit Becker [Jean-Claude Carriere], Frankenstein rode, 1958; Benoit Becker [Jean-Claude Carriere], La Cave de Frankenstein, 1959; David Case, The Dead End, 1969; Hal Kantor, The Adult Version of Frankenstein, 1970; Ed Martin, Frankenstein 69, 1972; Paul W.
Smith, Last Train, 1994; Graham Masterton, Mother of Invention, 1994; Adrian Cole, The Frankenstein Legacy, 1994; Kim Newman, Completist Heaven, 1994; Michael Marshall Smith, To Receive Is Better, 1994; Lisa Mortom, Poppi's Monster, 1994; Roberta Lannes, A Complete Woman, 1994.
Poetry (selected titles): Jo Fletcher, Frankenstein, 1994.
Dramatization (selected titles): Richard Brinsley Peake, Presumption; or, The Fate of Frankenstein, 1823; Henry M.
Riley, editor, Frankenstein (Classic Horror Films, vol.
Anthologies (selected titles): Calvin Beck, editor, The Frankenstein Reader, 1962; Peter Haining, editor, The Frankenstein File, 1977; Martin H.
Music (selected titles): Meyer Lutz, Richard Henry, Frankenstein, Or The Vampire's Victim / Frankenstein, Or The Model Man, 1887; Eric Sirota, Day of Wrath, 1990; Graham Brown, Geoff Meads, Joined at the Heart, 2007; Mel Brooks, Thomas Meehan, Young Frankenstein, 2007; Mark Baron, Jeffrey Jackson, Frankenstein--A New Musical, 2007.
Cohill; Il mostro di Frankenstein / The Monster of Frankenstein, Italy, 1920, producer: Luciano Albertini, director: Eugenio Testa, writing credits: Giovanni Drovetti, cast: Luciano Albertini, Umberto Guarracino, Linda Albertini, Aldo Mezzanotte; Frankenstein, United States, 1931, producers: Carl Laemmle Jr.
Critical studies (selected titles): Calvin Beck, editor, The Frankenstein Reader, 1962; Arthur Koestler, The Ghost in the Machine, 1967; Forrest J.
Quattrucci, narrator: Donald Sutherland; Nightmare: The Birth of Horror: Frankenstein, United Kingdom, 1996, producer: Letitia Knight, director: Derek Towers, cinematography: David South, narrator: Christopher Fraying; 100 Years of Horror: The Frankenstein Family, United States, 1996, producers: Ted Newsom, Dante J.