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neither fish, flesh, nor fowl

Neither one thing nor another; not belonging to any suitable class or description; not recognizable or characteristic of any one particular thing. We require a solution that directly deals with the issue at hand, but what the chancellor has put forward is, to my mind, neither fish, flesh nor fowl.
See also: fowl, neither, nor

run foul of (someone or something)

To be in severe disagreement, trouble, or difficulty with someone or something; to be at odds with someone or something, especially due to disobeying rules or laws. Always look into the laws of any place you visit, or you may end up unwittingly running foul of the local police. Ms. Banks has run foul of this university for the last time. She is no longer welcome here!
See also: foul, of, run

be neither fish nor fowl

To be difficult to describe or definitively categorize. What genre of music is this? It's neither fish nor fowl to me.
See also: fish, fowl, neither, nor

neither fish nor fowl

Neither one thing nor another; not belonging to any suitable class or description; not recognizable or characteristic of any one particular thing. We require a solution that directly deals with the issue at hand, but the proposal that has been put forward is, to my mind, neither fish nor fowl.
See also: fish, fowl, neither, nor

neither fish nor fowl

Cliché not any recognizable thing. The car that they drove up in was neither fish nor fowl. It must have been made out of spare parts. This proposal is neither fish nor fowl. I can't tell what you're proposing.
See also: fish, fowl, neither, nor

neither fish nor fowl

Also, neither fish nor flesh; neither fish, flesh, nor fowl. Not one or the other, not something fitting any category under discussion. For example, They felt he was neither fish nor fowl-not qualified to lead the department, yet not appropriate to work as a staff member either . This expression appeared in slightly different form in John Heywood's 1546 proverb collection ("Neither fish, nor flesh, nor good red herring") and is thought to allude to food for monks ( fish, because they abstained from meat), for the people ( flesh, or meat), and for the poor ( red herring, a very cheap fish).
See also: fish, fowl, neither, nor

neither fish nor fowl

If something or someone is neither fish nor fowl, they are difficult to identify or understand, because they seem partly like one thing and partly like another. Brunel's vessel was neither fish nor fowl: a passenger liner too ugly and dirty to offer much beyond novelty value. In the American sports press, this athlete is neither fish nor fowl, neither American nor entirely foreign. Note: People occasionally replace fish with flesh. She didn't look one of anything to Oatsie, neither flesh nor fowl, neither idiot nor intellectual. Note: `Fowl' is an old-fashioned word for a hen or other bird.
See also: fish, fowl, neither, nor

neither fish nor fowl (nor good red herring)

of indefinite character and difficult to identify or classify.
This expression arose with reference to dietary laws formerly laid down by the Church during periods of fasting or abstinence.
See also: fish, fowl, neither, nor

neither ˌfish nor ˈfowl

neither one thing nor another: Graduate teaching assistants are neither fish nor fowl, neither completely students nor teachers.
See also: fish, fowl, neither, nor

neither fish nor fowl

Having no specific characteristics; indefinite.
See also: fish, fowl, neither, nor

neither fish, flesh, nor fowl

Not one or the other; not fitting any category. This term dates from the sixteenth century and appeared in John Heywood’s 1546 Proverbs as “She is nother fyshe, nor fleshe, nor good red hearyng [herring].” The analogy refers to food for monks (fish), for the people (meat), and for the poor (red herring). Shakespeare also used the term; when Falstaff insults Mistress Quickly, he says she’s an otter because “She’s neither fish nor flesh; a man knows not where to have her” (Henry IV, Part 1, 3.3).
See also: fowl, neither, nor

neither fish nor fowl

Having no specific characteristics or category, not easily characterized. The phrase, which was originally “neither fish nor flesh nor fowl,” appeared in slightly different form in a 16th-century collection of proverbs as “neither fish, nor flesh, nor good red herring”: fish for monks who ate no meat, flesh for people who could afford meat, and cheap herring for the poor. The phrase is reminiscent of the old riddle: What is neither fish nor flesh, feathers nor bone/but still has fingers and thumbs of its own? Answer: a glove.
See also: fish, fowl, neither, nor
References in periodicals archive ?
By examining the specific resonances between the modern and Victorian scenes, we can discern what Pinter found in Fowles's novel and what he did with what he found (58).
Invoking specific tropes of detective fiction in the second section of the novel, Fowles generates the drive for solution ultimately to thwart it.[2] With the discovery of the apparent suicide and the disappearance of Bartholomew, Fowles depicts a familiar scenario: a crime has likely been committed here, and the solution must be found.
Launched in 1977, the Center for Black Cultural and Student Affairs at USC serves as a student support system and safe space for students of all backgrounds, says Fowles.
Fowles was part of the Scots squad in November but missed out on matchday selection.
In the community Fowles serves as board member with the Milwaukee Children's Choir.
Fowles failed to convert, but Alan Solomons' side held a two-point advantage at the interval.
I believe that Fowles will exert herself to the utmost for this cause," Bayrak said.
That Fowles was able not only to pull me through my ennui, but also to surprise me with the strength of the novel's end, is a testament to her skill as a novelist and the precision with which she was able to craft a realistic world that drew me in and wouldn't let go.
Swindells, 20, came up behind Robert Hignett and Saul Fowles as they were walking near Wigan Road, Ormskirk, on S their way to a party in the early hours of March 13.
The look is displayed in official police mugshots of baby-faced Harry Fowles, Ernest Haynes and Stephen McNickle.
"There are many reasons why novelists write," said English author John Fowles (1926-2005), "but they all have one thing in common: a need to create an alternative world." In novels such as The French Lieutenant's Woman (1969), which combines Victorian pastiche with postmodern interjections, and The Magus (1966), a novel merging fantasy and reality, Fowles challenged readers to find their own interpretations of events--and endings.
Summary: Jonathan Fowles wants to move Initiative beyond the 'vanilla offerings' permeating the media business
Hed Kandi will take place at Coral Bay on Sunday, from 9pm, and will feature top resident DJ, Andy Norman, accompanied by the amazing saxophonist Laura Fowles, also called The Lovely Laura.
"It's about the process of discovery," says the cofounder of Uniform Wares, the London-based watch brand he launched nearly three years ago with fellow designer Oliver Fowles. "I think that's the way a lot of men tend to purchase products.
The introductory chapter of John Fowles: Visionary and Voyeur is titled "Voyeurism and Other Visual Pleasures" and does, at its end, address voyeurism in Fowles's fiction.