fort

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man the fort

To mind or take charge of a location during the time in which it is unattended by another. Don't worry, honey, I'll man the fort at home until you get back from the grocery store. The entire editorial department left the office early for their Christmas celebration, leaving just a couple of interns to man the fort for the rest of the day.
See also: fort, man

be like Fort Knox

To be inaccessible, usually because the item or place in question is locked or guarded. Fort Knox is a military site in Kentucky where stores of gold are kept. The kids are home by themselves, but don't worry, the house is like Fort Knox with all the security cameras. I can't get into the safe, it's like Fort Knox!
See also: fort, Knox, like

hold (down) the fort

To maintain the proper functioning or order of some situation or place, typically during someone's absence. Don't worry, boss, I'll hold down the fort while you're away.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

Fig. to take care of a place while someone who is usually there is gone, such as a store or one's home. (From western movies.) I'm going next door to visit Mrs. Jones. You stay here and hold the fort. You should open the store at eight o'clock and hold the fort until I get there at ten.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

Assume responsibility, especially in another's absence; also, maintain a secure position. For example, Harry did a good job of holding the fort until his boss recovered, or Can you hold the fort in the kitchen? This expression has been traced to an order given by General William Tecumseh Sherman in 1864, which was repeated as "Hold the fort [against the enemy at Allatoona] at all costs, for I am coming."
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

mainly BRITISH or

hold down the fort

AMERICAN
If you hold the fort for someone, you look after things for them while they are somewhere else. Her husband holds the fort at their Norfolk home during the week. You can hold down the fort here. I shouldn't be too long.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

take responsibility for a situation while someone is absent.
See also: fort, hold

hold the ˈfort

(British English) (American English hold down the ˈfort) (informal) be in charge or taking care of something while the person usually responsible is not there: I’m going abroad for a few weeks, and Kathy will hold the fort while I’m away.
See also: fort, hold

be like/as safe as Fort ˈKnox

(about a building) be strongly built, with many locks, strong doors, alarms, etc. so that it is very safe and difficult for thieves to enter: This home of yours is like Fort Knox.Financially she’s as safe as Fort Knox. Fort Knox is a military base in Kentucky where most of the US’s store of gold is kept.
See also: fort, Knox, like, safe

hold the fort

tv. to remain behind and take care of things. I left John there to hold the fort.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

Informal
1. To assume responsibility, especially in another's absence.
2. To maintain a secure position.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort, to

To keep things going until further support arrives. The expression comes, as might be suspected, from a literal military order. It has been traced to one given by Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman in 1864, during the American Civil War, to Gen. John M. Corse at Allatoona. Corse was told to give up so as to avoid unnecessary bloodshed, but he refused, saying he had received an order from Sherman saying, “Hold the fort at all costs, for I am coming.” Records show that the actual words had been, “Hold out, relief is coming,” but fort is what caught on and was further popularized when it was made the refrain of a gospel song by Philip Paul Bliss.
See also: hold
References in classic literature ?
Within hailing distance they set up such a loud shouting that presently heads appeared above the top of the parapet and soon answering shouts were rising from within Fort Dinosaur.
They told them of the infamous act of Baron Friedrich von Schoenvorts and his German crew who had stolen the U-33, breaking their parole, and steaming away toward the subterranean opening through the barrier cliffs that carried the waters of the inland sea into the open Pacific beyond; and of the cowardly shelling of the fort.
Thus of the original party of eleven Allies and nine Germans that had constituted the company of the U-33 when she left English waters after her capture by the crew of the English tug there were but five now to be accounted for at Fort Dinosaur.
Besides, it was my life or his when once he was in the fort.
There was no use dividing it at present, for if gems of such value were found upon us it would cause suspicion, and there was no privacy in the fort nor any place where we could keep them.
Of course he thought he had taken refuge in the fort, and applied for admission there himself next day, but could find no trace of Achmet.
This shot that you see," added the scout, kicking the harmless iron with his foot, "has plowed the 'arth in its road from the fort, and we shall hunt for the furrow it has made, when all other signs may fail.
The water, the banks, the forests, the now distant bridge, fort and men, all were commingled and blurred.
A replica of that policy is now on display at the Custer House in the Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park in Mandan, N.
This was the first of many such disbursements of federal aid to Fort and his comrades--including a young race hustler-turned-minister named Jesse Jackson.
MTMC's worldwide Operations Center is now functioning from MTMC Fort Eustis.
Fort commander Brigader General Marcellus Crocker relayed Carlton's order late in 1864.