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bring (something) to the fore

To emphasize something or make it more noticeable. Be sure to bring this argument to the fore when you rewrite your paper. Discrepancies in the yearly budget report brought questions of corruption to the fore.
See also: bring, fore, to

come to the fore

To be emphasized or made more noticeable. This argument needs to come to the fore when you rewrite your paper. Questions of corruption came to the fore after the auditors found discrepancies in the yearly budget report.
See also: come, fore, to

fore and aft

1. At the front and back of something. This phrase is nautical in origin, referring to the bow (located at the front) and the stern (located at the back) of a ship. We need to change the locks fore and aft, I'm afraid.
2. Everywhere; all over. There are people fore and aft—I'll never be able to find you!
See also: aft, and, fore

to the fore

At, in, or toward a position of emphasis, prominence, or importance; to the forefront. Discrepancies in the yearly budget report brought questions of corruption to the fore. The tennis legend came to the fore when she was just 15 years old.
See also: fore, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bring something to the fore

to move something forward; to make something more prominent or noticeable. All the talk about costs brought the question of budgets to the fore. The question of budget planning was brought to the fore.
See also: bring, fore, to

come to the fore

Fig. to become prominent; to become important. The question of salary has now come to the fore. Since his great successes as a prosecutor, he has really come to the fore in city politics.
See also: come, fore, to

fore and aft

at the front and the back, usually of a boat or ship. They had to attach new lights fore and aft because the old ones were not bright enough to meet the new regulations. The captain ordered a watch stationed fore and aft.
See also: aft, and, fore
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fore and aft

Both front and back, everywhere, as in The children clung to the teacher fore and aft. This expression is nautical terminology for the bow, or front, and the stern, or back, of a vessel. Today it is also used more broadly. [First half of 1600s]
See also: aft, and, fore

to the fore

In, into, or toward a position of prominence, as in A new virtuoso pianist has come to the fore. [First half of 1800s]
See also: fore, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

be/come to the ˈfore

(British English) (American English be at the ˈfore) be or become important and noticed by people; play an important part: She came very much to the fore in the area during the local campaign against the new bypass.
Fore means ‘front’.
See also: come, fore, to

bring something to the ˈfore

make something become noticed by people: His political opinions have been brought to the fore recently, particularly after his television appearance last week.
See also: bring, fore, something, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

to the fore

In, into, or toward a position of prominence: A new virtuoso has come to the fore.
See also: fore, to
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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