food

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eat (one's) own dog food

1. To use the product(s) one's company produces or develops as a means of demonstrating or validating its quality, capabilities, or superiority to other brands. Used primarily in reference to software industries, the phrase is thought to have originated with advertisements for Alpo dog food in the 1980s, in which actor Lorne Green promoted the product by pointing out that he fed it to his own dogs. The company sent out a memo to all of its employees telling them to eat their own dog food to demonstrate their new operating system's speed and ease of use.
2. By extension, to use software one's company is developing—usually in its beta form—so as to test it for flaws and ensure its ease of use by end users before it is released. We didn't have time to eat our own dog food before the new operating system's release, so I'm worried it may still have a lot of glitches that haven't been accounted for yet.
See also: dog, eat, food, own

dogfood

1. To use the product(s) one's company produces or develops as a means of demonstrating or validating its quality, capabilities, or superiority to other brands. Used primarily in reference to software industries, the phrase is thought to have originated with advertisements for Alpo dog food in the 1980s, in which actor Lorne Green promoted the product by pointing out that he fed it to his own dogs. The company sent out a memo to all of its employees telling them to dogfood their new operating system to demonstrate its speed and ease of use to the public. The company has a strict policy of dogfooding their website's own messenger system rather than traditional email, much to the consternation of some employees.
2. By extension, to use software one's company is developing—usually in its beta form—so as to test it for flaws and ensure its ease of use by end users before it is released. We didn't have time to dogfood the new operating system before its release, so I'm worried it may still have a lot of glitches that haven't been accounted for yet.

at the bottom of the food chain

At or occupying the position of least importance or influence in a social, corporate, or political hierarchy. As an intern, you're always at the bottom of the food chain, so be prepared to do whatever anyone else tells you to do.
See also: bottom, chain, food, of

at the top of the food chain

At or occupying the position of most importance or influence in a social, corporate, or political hierarchy. Some high school seniors revel in the fact that they are now at the top of the food chain, using their newfound and largely imaginary authority to boss around younger students.
See also: chain, food, of, top

put food on the table

To earn enough money to provide the basic necessities for oneself and (often) one's family. With my hours at work being cut so dramatically, I just don't know how I'll be able to put food on the table. At the end of the day, as long as I'm putting food on the table, I don't care what kind of career I have.
See also: food, on, put, table

food baby

A large and/or protruding stomach (thought to resemble a pregnant belly) after one has eaten a big meal. Don't take any pictures right now, my stomach is huge! I totally have a food baby!
See also: baby, food

food chain

1. A hierarchy of organisms that transfer food energy between them. The smallest organisms are at the bottom—and they are preyed upon by the larger ones above them in the food chain. Grizzly bears are at the top of the food chain.
2. A hierarchy of people in a group or organization. Often used in the phrases "at the top of the food chain" and "at the bottom of the food chain." As a medical intern, I'm at the bottom of the food chain, but I'll move up soon enough. It will take a while to move up the food chain in such a large company, but you'll make manager soon enough.
See also: chain, food

food for worms

A dead person. You better drive more carefully, unless you want to be food for worms!
See also: food, Worms

superfood

A food that is hailed as exceptionally nutritious. I know kale is a superfood, but I just can't force myself to eat it.

food coma

slang A state of drowsiness and lethargy induced by eating a large quantity of food (often carbohydrates). I was in a food coma for the rest of the night after Thanksgiving dinner.
See also: food

give (one) food for thought

To give one something to consider. That meeting really gave me food for thought—I might invest in their company after all.
See also: food, give, thought

I could murder (some kind of food)

I'm so hungry that I could (or would like to) devour (some kind of food). I'm famished after that hike. I could murder a hamburger right now.
See also: could, kind, murder, of

food for thought

Something to consider. That meeting really gave me food for thought—I might invest in their company after all.
See also: food, thought

to go

1. Left; still remaining. We've gotten through 100 boxes of books so far—just 25 to go. There is still about half an hour to go before the show starts.
2. Ordered or packaged to be taken out of a restaurant or off of a premises and eaten elsewhere, especially at home. Let's just get the food to go so we can eat it while we watch the movie at home. I couldn't finish the meal, so I took it to go.

be off (one's) food

To not be hungry or willing to eat, as due to illness. While I was sick, I was off my food for a week and lost a few pounds.
See also: food, off

flavor food with something

to season a food with something. He flavors his gravy with a little sage. Can you flavor the soup with a little less pepper next time?
See also: flavor, food

food for thought

Fig. something for someone to think about; issues to be considered. Your essay has provided me with some interesting food for thought. My adviser gave me some food for thought about job opportunities.
See also: food, thought

starve for some food

to be very hungry for something. I am just starved for some fresh peaches. We were starved for dinner by the time we finally got to eat.
See also: food, starve

*to go

 
1. [of a purchase of cooked food] to be taken elsewhere to be eaten. (*Typically: buy some food ~; get some food ~; have some food ~; order some food ~.) Let's stop here and buy six hamburgers to go. I didn't thaw anything for dinner. Let's stop off on the way home and get something to go.
2. [of a number or an amount] remaining; yet to be dealt with. I finished with two of them and have four to go.

food for thought

An idea or issue to ponder, as in That interesting suggestion of yours has given us food for thought. This metaphoric phrase, transferring the idea of digestion from the stomach to mulling something over in the mind, dates from the late 1800s, although the idea was also expressed somewhat differently at least three centuries earlier.
See also: food, thought

junk food

Prepackaged snack food that is high in calories but low in nutritional value; also, anything attractive but negligible in value. For example, Nell loves potato chips and other junk food, or When I'm sick in bed I often resort to TV soap operas and similar junk food. [c. 1970]
See also: food, junk

food for thought

COMMON If something gives you food for thought, it makes you think very hard about an issue. This Italian trip gave us all much food for thought. It was poor Alan dying like that, gave me food for thought.
See also: food, thought

to go

COMMON If you buy prepared food to go, you buy it and take it somewhere else to eat it. I'll have a pizza and fries to go, please.

food for thought

something that warrants serious consideration or reflection.
See also: food, thought

to go

(of food or drink from a restaurant or cafe) to be eaten or drunk off the premises. North American

food for worms

a dead person.
See also: food, Worms

be off your ˈfood

have no appetite, probably because you are ill or depressed: She’s off her food, she’s sleeping very badly and she can’t concentrate.
See also: food, off

food for ˈthought

an event, a remark, a fact, etc. which should be considered very carefully because it is interesting, important, etc: The lectures were very interesting and gave much food for thought.
See also: food, thought

...to ˈgo


1 still remaining before something happens, finishes or is completed: There’s only a few seconds to go before the rocket takes off.With only two kilometres to go, Max is still first.
2 (informal, especially American English) (of food bought in a restaurant, shop, etc.) to be taken away and eaten somewhere else: Two coffees to go, please.

junk food

n. food that is typically high in fats and salt and low in nutritional value; food from a fast-food restaurant. Junk food tastes good no matter how greasy it is.
See also: food, junk

rabbit food

n. lettuce; salad greens. Rabbit food tends to have a lot of vitamin C.
See also: food, rabbit

squirrel-food

n. a nut; a loony person. The driver of the car—squirrel-food, for sure—just sat there smiling. Some squirrel-food came over and asked for a sky hook.

to go

mod. packaged to be taken out; packaged to be carried home to eat. Do you want it to go, or will you eat it here?

worm-food

n. a corpse. You wanna end up worm-food? Just keep smarting off.