Flathead

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flathead

n. a stupid person. Carl, don’t act like such a flathead.

flatheaded

mod. stupid. Martin seems flatheaded, but he’s quite brilliant.
See also: flathead
References in periodicals archive ?
Estimating exploitation and modeling the effects of hand fishing on a flathead catfish population in East Texas.
As a result, William Gray never did establish a mission among the Flatheads, nor did he ever quite live down the reputation he acquired for abandoning those entrusted to his care.
Part 1, "History and Identity," explores Flathead self-definition and the history of exploitation, topics which are then folded into an exploration of how these affect depression-like symptoms.
Studies of radio-tagged flatheads at various lakes around the country underline their loyalty to specific locations.
The farthest east that people find flatheads on a consistent basis is the Apalachicola and its tributaries.
While the Little Elk Indians appear cast as a fictional tribe, it is evident that McNickle based his story upon the Flathead Nation in Montana.
According to the report, flatheads were most abundant in areas of widely scattered rock, evidently selecting these sites to break current and reduce energy output.
Generally, when fishing wood piles, depth is not much of an issue; I have caught flatheads in as shallow as 2 feet to as deep as 40.
The issue is that it targets flatheads during a time when they're concentrated in specific areas, and noodlers have the potential to catch quite a few fish in a short period of time.
The invasive flatheads are quite a draw for anglers all throughout the southeast, averaging over 70 anglers for each stop and usually twice that for the final leg at the end of September.
All catfish, and especially flathead catfish, seem to be able to detect the presence of the micro-electrical charges produced by other fish, and may be able to differentiate among fish of different sizes and species.
The middle and lower parts of the river have wood--lots of wood--the primary structure to fish for flatheads.
Robby Robinson has landed more than 1,400 flatheads from flood-control reservoirs and rivers in southeast Ohio during his decades of stalking them, but he says those big catfish have come one or two at a time, and often with a week or more between catches.
Bream have long been used as bait for flatheads, but must be caught via hook and line in Florida (it is illegal to castnet native bream).
Long-term tracking studies in Midwestern rivers show that flatheads can be immobile for up to 23 hours a day, holed-up in lairs that they leave only when feeding.