fixing to die

(redirected from Fixin' To Die)
Also found in: Acronyms.

fixing to die

Nearing death; likely to die. That patient isn't doing well at all—I think he's fixing to die.
See also: die, fix, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fixing to die

and FTD
preparing to die. (Hospital jocular, cruel word play.) Yes, he’s going. FTD. Circling the drain. Bed 205 is fixin’ to die. Call the family.
See also: die, fix, to
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Most thrilling of all, a tidal wave of extraordinary new sounds washed in from the West Coast of America - The Doors (with their eponymous debut and Strange Days), Love (Da Capo, Forever Changes), Jefferson Airplane (Surrealistic Pillow, After Bathing At Baxters), Country Joe & The Fish (Electric Music For The Mind & Body, I Feel Like I'm Fixin' To Die).
Needless to say this routine was followed by Fixin' To Die Rag and a brief encore of Woody Guthrie's This Land Is Your Land.
Some musicologists will tell you that the `I Feel Like I'm Fixin' to Die Rag' by Country Joe & the Fish is one of the most important songs to emerge from the 1960s.
But now he knows his self that the evil is fixin' to die, and he's happy because he knows he's going to go to heaven."
Well, yes, at least according to Lee Atwater: Fixin' to Die, Robert Myers's sharp-witted one-person play based on the life of the RNC bigwig who died of a brain tumor in 1990 at the age of 40.
Even portrayed with warts and all, the Lee Atwater of Fixin' to Die is a complex, sympathetic and-dare we say it?-likable character.
It was, of course, de rigueur to have the breezeblock-thick paperback edition of Lord Of The Rings jammed into the pocket of your Afghan coat, and equally crucial to tuck a couple of iconic LP sleeves - The Incredible String Band's 5000 Spirits / Layers Of The Onion, perhaps, or Country Joe & The Fish's I Feel Like I'm Fixin' To Die - under your arm whenever you popped down to your local for a pint of snakebite.
Musical numbers: "Woodstock," "Summer in the City," "Goin' up the Country," "Mercedes Benz," "The Times They Are a Changin'," "Black Magic Woman," "Somebody to Love," "Teach Your Children Well," "Fixin' to Die Rag," "Find the Cost of Freedom," "For What It's Worth," "White Rabbit," "With a Little Help From My Friends," "The Weight," "Piece of My Heart," "Let's Get Together," "Star Spangled Banner," "Turn, Turn, Turn (To Everything There Is a Season)."
Bukka White's Funny In My Mind (I Believe I'm Fixin' To Die) is little more than a by-the-numbers semiplugged shuffle and Dylan's One More Cup Of Coffee is decaffeinated.