finders keepers(, losers weepers)

(redirected from Finders keepers, losers weepers)

finders keepers

If someone finds something, they are entitled to keep it (even if it belongs to someone else). This phrase is part of the children's rhyme "finders keepers, losers weepers." Jake yelled "finders keepers" as he dashed toward the house with the sparkling ring he had discovered. A: "Hey, that's my favorite toy!" B: "But I found it out on the playground. Finders keepers, losers weepers!"
See also: finder, keeper

finders keepers(, losers weepers)

A children's rhyme meaning that if someone finds something, they are entitled to keep it (even if it belongs to someone else). Jake yelled "finders keepers" as he dashed toward the house with the sparkling ring he had discovered. A: "Hey, that's my favorite toy!" B: "But I found it out on the playground. Finders keepers, losers weepers!"
See also: finder, loser

finders keepers(, losers weepers)

Prov. If you find something, you are entitled to keep it. (This is a children's rhyme and sounds childish when used by adults.) Bill: Hey! How come you're using my fountain pen? Fred: It's mine now. I found it on the floor—finders keepers, losers weepers. Child: That's my hat. You can't have it. Playmate: I found it. Finders keepers.
See also: finder, keeper

finders keepers

If someone, especially a child, says finders keepers, they mean that they have a right to keep something they have found. My umbrella has not been returned. Obviously, someone picked it up and has made no effort to find the owner. Finders, keepers.
See also: finder, keeper

finders keepers (losers weepers)

used, often humorously, to assert that whoever finds something by chance is entitled to keep it (and the person who lost it will just have to lament its loss). informal
This expression has been widely used since the early 19th century, although the idea goes back much further and is found in the work of the Roman dramatist Plautus. A variant sometimes heard is findings keepings .
See also: finder, keeper

ˌfinders ˈkeepers

(saying) (often used by children) anyone who finds something has a right to keep it: I just found a pound coin on the ground. Finders keepers, so it’s mine!
See also: finder, keeper
References in periodicals archive ?
* "Finders keepers, losers weepers" is the theme of the newest James Lumber Center for the Performing Arts play.
There's a sort of 'finders keepers, losers weepers' mentality at work," Albrecht says.
Is the proper response "Finders keepers, losers weepers," as Joseph tries to tell Devon?
And now her former employer, drug giant Pfizer, is whining that she's playing "finders keepers, losers weepers".
That old 'finders keepers, losers weepers' thing comes into play as if it was some sort of a lucky win in a lottery.
Manama A Tunisian waiter chose not to follow the old saying "Finders keepers, losers weepers" when he discovered that 120 million Tunisian dinars (Dh309 million) was deposited by mistake in his bank account and returned the amount to the bank.
FINDERS keepers, losers weepers. It's an old adage which many were reared on and which has allowed people to think they are not stealing when they pick up something in the street.
Finders Keepers, Losers Weepers A Rochester, New York man falsely reported his car stolen before reporting to federal prison to serve a sentence for a previous firearms conviction.
Great day in the morning for someone, finders keepers, losers weepers. Oh, it's likely the bill will be plunked on the bar when Cameron opens his doors this afternoon, with some stinker shouting a round for everybody and his cronies crowding the bar thanking the stinker for spending our family's payday, the vacation my Jack worked hard hours for in that warehouse some German spy would like to put a match to.
FINDERS keepers, losers weepers, goes the old saying - one that is also apt for the second-hand car market.
"When we were kids, it was always 'finders keepers, losers weepers,'" Hoffman told the Journal Sentinel.