filling

(redirected from Fillings)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Fillings: Dental Fillings

fill in the blank

1. To provide information or details, usually by actually writing something in a blank space on a test, form, etc. Fill in the blank with what you think is the correct answer.
2. To figure something out; to determine an answer to something that was previously unknown. My parents may not know who dented the car now, but they'll fill in the blank eventually.
See also: blank, fill

fill in the details

To give information about a particular topic, sometimes by actually writing it in the blank space on a form. Please fill in the details about your medical history on this form. Who are you dating? Come on, fill in the details for me!
See also: detail, fill

back and fill

1. To move a ship's sails in an alternating fashion to accommodate the wind in a narrow channel. We need to back and fill the sails in order to pass through this channel.
2. To be indecisive. You need to make a decision and stick to it—quit backing and filling!
See also: and, back, fill

fill a/the void

To replace someone or something that is absent or missing. No, we got that project done—Rebecca filled the void while you were on vacation. If Mike doesn't play sports this year, what will fill the void besides his trouble-making friends?
See also: fill, void

fill in

1. To provide information or details, usually by actually writing something in a blank space on a test, form, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fill" and "in." Fill in the blank with the correct answer. Ugh, I had to fill in so much paperwork on my first day of work. Make sure you fill in the form completely, or they may reject your application.
2. To substitute for someone or something. In this usage, "fill in" is followed by "for." Can you fill in for me on the conference call? I have to leave early today for a doctor's appointment.
3. To fill a hole or void, especially so something looks more uniform in appearance. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fill" and "in." Your eyebrows are looking a little sparse—can I fill them in? The landscaper is coming today to fill in all these holes in the lawn.
4. To inform one of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fill" and "in." Fill me in—what happened at the party last night? The weekly newsletter is intended to fill in everyone about company policy, but no one reads it.
See also: fill

fill out

1. To provide information or details, usually by actually writing something in a blank space on a test, form, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fill" and "out." Fill out the blank with the correct answer. Ugh, I had to fill out so much paperwork on my first day of work. Make sure you fill out the form completely, or they may reject your application.
2. To become less thin or skinny by gaining weight or muscle or by simply growing into a fuller figure. He was such a skinny kid that I'm glad to see he's finally filled out some.
3. To properly fit into a piece of clothing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fill" and "in." I can't wear a strapless dress—I don't have the bust to fill it out!
4. To become less sparse in appearance. After being so bare all winter, the trees are finally filling out again.
See also: fill, out

fill (one's) boots

1. To take or obtain as much of something as one can. Primarily heard in UK. Since that store announced its going-out-of-business sale, customers have been filling their boots with formerly overpriced housewares.
2. To replace one in some role; to take over for one in some position. You do so much for the company that I don't see how anyone could fill your boots.
See also: boot, fill

fill the bill

To be helpful, useful, or what is needed in a certain situation. A: "I need another string of lights." B: "Will this one fill the bill?"
See also: bill, fill

fill up

1. To cause someone to feel full from eating, as by providing them with food. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fill" and "up." If the kids aren't hungry, it's probably because your mother filled them up with junk food.
2. To become full of something. The hamper filled up in no time when we got back from our trip.
3. To cause something to become full of or crammed with something In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fill" and "up." Did you fill the hamper up already? Where am I going to put my dirty clothes?
4. To put fuel in a vehicle's gas tank. Let me just stop and fill up before we get on the highway.
See also: fill, up

back and fill

Fig. to act indecisively; to change one's direction repeatedly; to reverse one's course. (Originally nautical, referring to trimming the sails so as to alternately fill them with wind and release the wind, in order to maneuver in a narrow space.) The president spent most of his speech backing and filling on the question of taxation. The other candidate was backing and filling on every issue, depending on whom she was addressing.
See also: and, back, fill

fill in

[for an indentation, hole, etc.] to become full. The scar filled in after a few months. Will this hole in the ground fill in by itself, or should I put some dirt in?
See also: fill

fill in (for someone or something)

Fig. to substitute for someone or something; to take the place of someone or something. I will have to fill in for Wally until he gets back. I don't mind filling in.
See also: fill

fill out

to become full; to gain weight. About a month after her debilitating illness, Maggie began to fill out again. The fruit on the trees began to fill out, and we knew it was going to ripen soon.
See also: fill, out

fill someone in (on someone or something)

to tell someone the details about someone or something. Please fill me in on what happened last night. Please fill in the committee on the details.
See also: fill

fill someone or something up (with something)

to put as much as possible into someone or something. We filled him up with chili and crackers. We will fill up the basket with leaves. I will fill the basket up with flowers.
See also: fill, up

fill something in

 
1. to add material to an indentation, hole, etc., to make it full. You had better fill the crack in with something before you paint the wall. You should fill in the cracks first.
2. Fig. to write in the blank spaces on a paper; to write on a form. (See also Fill in the blanks) Please fill this form in. I will fill in the form for you.
See also: fill

fill something out

Fig. to complete a form by writing in the blank spaces. Please fill this form out and send it back to us in the mail. I will fill out the form as you asked.
See also: fill, out

fill the bill

 and fit the bill
to be acceptable. Jane: I need some string. Tom: Here's some twine. Will it fill the bill? I need cloth to make a shirt. This muslin ought to fit the bill.
See also: bill, fill

fill up

 
1. to become full. The creek filled up after the heavy rain yesterday. The rain barrel began to fill up during the storm.
2. to fill one's gas tank. I've got to stop and fill up. The gas tank is running low. We will fill up at the next little town.
See also: fill, up

back and fill

Vacillate, be undecided, as in This measure will never be passed if the town meeting continues to back and fill. This term comes from sailing ships, where it signifies alternately backing and filling the sails, a method used when the wind is running against a ship in a narrow channel. The sail is hauled back against the wind and braced so that the tide or current carries the ship forward against the wind. Then the sail must be swung around and filled, to keep the ship on course. The term's figurative use for indecisiveness dates from the mid-1800s.
See also: and, back, fill

fill in

1. Complete something, especially by supplying more information or detail. For example, Be sure to fill in your salary history. It is also put as fill in the blanks, as in We'll rely on Mary to fill in the blanks. Yet another related usage is fill someone in, as in I couldn't attend, so will you fill me in? The first term dates from the mid-1800s; the others from the first half of the 1900s. Also see fill out.
2. Also, fill in for. Take someone's place, substitute for. For example, The understudy had to fill in at the last minute, or I can't come but my wife will fill in for me. Also see fill someone's shoes.
See also: fill

fill out

1. Complete by supplying required information, especially in writing. For example, Please fill out the application form, or I don't quite understand this drawing, so fill out the details. [Late 1800s]
2. Become enlarged, distended, rounded in outline. For example, The wind filled out the sails, or He's put on weight and really filled out. Applied to objects, this expression dates from about 1700, but to persons or animals becoming fatter, only from the late 1800s.
See also: fill, out

fill the bill

Serve a particular purpose well, as in I was afraid there wasn't enough chicken for everyone, but this casserole will fill the bill , or Karen's testimony just fills the bill, so we're sure to get a conviction. This expression alludes to adding less-known performers to a program (or bill) in order to make a long enough entertainment. [First half of 1800s]
See also: bill, fill

back and fill

OLD-FASHIONED
If someone backs and fills, they keep changing their opinion or failing to make a decision. They backed and filled for over six weeks until I told them that I would do the job myself. Note: People also talk about backing and filling to refer to this kind of behaviour. The markets are nervous, so we are likely to see some backing and filling.
See also: and, back, fill

back and fill

1 go in contrary directions 2 be indecisive, temporize, vacillate. chiefly North American
The expression was originally nautical: to back is to sail backwards, to fill , to sail forwards (from the notion of the wind filling the sails).
2 2003 Commonweal Even as she wants to advance boldly, therefore, she is required by the evidence to back and fill, leaving the reader with a bewildering combination of affirmation and qualification.
See also: and, back, fill

fill in

v.
1. To provide someone with essential or newly acquired information: I didn't receive the information in the mail—could you fill me in? Please fill in the new secretary about our rules.
2. To provide something, especially required information, in written form or on a document: The applicant filled the answers in on the registration form. The students filled in the test forms.
3. To cover completely the bounded surface of something: Fill in all the rectangles on the page with blue ink. The artist filled all the stencils in with pastels.
4. To act as a substitute; stand in: When I was sick, my colleague filled in. The understudy filled in for the sick actor last night.
See also: fill

fill out

v.
1. To provide required information in written form on something, such as a document: She carefully filled out the job application. He filled the voter registration form out.
2. To become larger, fuller, or fatter: The child filled out after he reached puberty.
3. To cause something to become larger, fuller, or fatter: The reporter filled out the article with extra anecdotes. The speaker filled the lecture out with a slide show.
4. To be large enough to fit some article of clothing properly: You don't really fill out that dress—it is a little baggy in places.
See also: fill, out

fill up

v.
1. To become full: The bucket filled up with rain. The train filled up quickly, so we had to stand in the aisle.
2. To cause something to become full: I filled up the sink with soapy water. We inflated the pool and filled it up with water.
3. To fill some vehicle with fuel: I said to the mechanic, "Fill it up!" You'd better fill up the car soon. If we don't fill up now, we could run out of gas.
See also: fill, up

filling station

n. a liquor store. (From an old name for an automobile service station.) Please stop at the filling station and get some suds on your way home.
See also: filling, station

back and fill

1. Nautical To maneuver a vessel in a narrow channel by adjusting the sails so as to let the wind in and out of them in alteration.
2. To vacillate in one's actions or decisions.
See also: and, back, fill

fill the bill

Informal
To serve a particular purpose.
See also: bill, fill
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers found that overall, there were no major differences between patients receiving amalgam or composite fillings in terms of filling failure rates.
Key Words: Dental students, iatrogenic errors, periapical radiograph, Quality, root canal fillings.
A Government spokesman said: "If there is a proven allergic reaction to a constituent metal of an amalgam filling which is causing oral symptoms for the patients, a consultant may recommend replacement of the amalgam fillings.
Placement of fillings during these periods was rare, and the study had other limitations, cautioned lead investigator Lisa A.
But the team cautions that due to the significant mercury loss over time, human exposure to mercury lost from fillings is "still of concern," and that further research is needed to determine when, how and in what form mercury is lost from fillings.
Data from 507 children in Lisbon, Portugal, show that urinary levels of mercury were higher among those with mercury amalgam fillings compared to participants treated with a mercury-free composite.
50 NHS Silver/amalgam fillings and treatment TOTAL pounds 189
The reason for the quality may lie in the fact that Wales has poorer dental health than England and more younger people are being given fillings.
Just before serving, arrange desired fruits in attractive design on top of chocolate filling.
Removing old fillings does get rid of the cause of most metallic toxic secretions, but it will not eliminate the poisons already stored in your bodily tissues from years of chewing and vapor emission.
Choose any two of the following fillings (each filling makes 12 canape-sized tarts)
However, little research has been conducted on dentists' patients, who may not face occupationally elevated exposures but who have had varying numbers of dental fillings installed over the course of their lives.
The mercury issue goes back at least to 1850, and no one has conclusively shown that mercury fillings are safe.
Many individuals enjoy sandwiches with meat- or jellylike fillings between two conventional slices of bread.