fest

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gabfest

1. slang A casual gathering in which people chat for an extended period of time. Can I sleep in your dorm room tonight? My roommate and her friends are having a real gabfest in mine.
2. slang An extended conversation. The last time I saw Steph, we had a gabfest in the grocery store parking lot, of all places.

hoochfest

slang A party featuring the consumption of large quantities of alcohol. "Hooch" is a slang name for liquor, especially that which has been made or sold illegally. I'm worried that the kids are going to have a hoochfest while we're out of town.

hopfest

slang A party featuring the consumption of beer, often in large quantities. Hops are an ingredient of beer. I'm worried that the kids are going to have a hopfest while we're out of town.

sleep fest

1. Some event or situation in which people spend a lot of time sleeping. My son is having some friends over for the night. They're always really rowdy until the early hours, but then it's usually a sleep fest the whole next day.
2. Some event or situation that causes one to fall asleep because it is so boring or unstimulating. This director's work is usually really interesting, but I found his latest film to be a total sleep fest.
See also: fest, sleep

slugfest

1. A fight in which two or more participants punch with their bare hands; a fistfight. A portmanteau of "slug" (meaning "to punch") and "festival." The arguing led to pushing and shoving, which eventually led to an all-out slugfest. She came away from the slugfest with a black eye and a broken hand.
2. A particularly intense or heated argument between two or more people in which points, rebuttals, accusations, etc., are exchanged back and forth. The senator is bracing for a slugfest when she puts her proposal before Congress for a vote. The case has truly been a slugfest between the two large companies' teams of lawyers.

snoozefest

slang
1. Some event or situation in which people spend a lot of time sleeping. My son is having some friends over for the night. They're always really rowdy until the early hours, but then it's usually a snoozefest the whole next day.
2. Some event or situation that causes one to fall asleep because it is so boring or unstimulating. This director's work is usually really interesting, but I found his latest film to be a total snoozefest.

snorefest

1. Some event or situation in which people spend a lot of time sleeping. My son is having some friends over for the night. They're always really rowdy until the early hours, but then it's usually a snorefest the whole next day.
2. Some event or situation that causes one to fall asleep because it is so boring or unstimulating. This director's work is usually really interesting, but I found his latest film to be a total snorefest.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

gabfest

(ˈgæbfɛst)
n. an event where much chattering or gossip takes place. There’s a gabfest going on in Clare’s room.

hoochfest

verb

hopfest

n. a beer-drinking party. We went to a big hopfest over at Willy’s, but it broke up early.

slugfest

1. n. a fight; a festival of slugging. They went out in the alley for a real slugfest.
2. n. a festival of arguing. The president emerged from the slugfest with control of the company still hers.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(22) Some of Le Pautre's images related to music and theatre can be found in Preaud, Graveurs du XVII siecle, nos.42-5 (frontispieces to opera texts), nos.51-2 (court entertainments), no.933 (Lambert Airs), no.954 (Perrine lute music), nos.972-5 (images of Lully's opera Les Festes de l'Armour et de Bacchus).
He is also credited with the 1674 productions of Alceste, Egologue de Versailles, and Les Festes de l'Amour et de Bacchus.
(28) This plate of 1678 is labelled Les Festes de l'Amour et de Bacchus.
SUCH was Mme de Scudery's impression of the ballroom erected for the Feste de Versailles on 18 July 1668.
Although this number would have created extremely cramped seating conditions, it is still less than two-thirds of the conjectured 1,500 guests at the 1668 feste.
(4) Andre Felibien, Relation de la Feste de Versailles (Paris, 1668); all references here are taken from the 1679 edition.
Since the dance at the 1668 feste is clearly billed as a court ball, these dancers were certainly courtiers, not professional dancers.
Homelies suyvant les matieres traictees es principales festes & solennitez de l'annee.