cherchez la femme

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cherchez la femme

A French phrase meaning "look for the woman," the idea being that when a man starts behaving strangely, it is often because he is attracted to or involved with a woman. The phrase is typically attributed to French author Alexandre Dumas père. Whenever Todd starts dressing better and being punctual, just cherchez la femme.
See also: femme, la

cherchez la femme

This French phrase that translates as “look for a woman,” originated with the elder Alexandre Dumas in his novel The Mohicans of Paris. Its meaning is that unusual male behavior can often be traced to involvement with a female. For example, countless generations of adolescent boys who never paid attention to their wardrobe or personal grooming suddenly became interested in clothing fashions. They washed their face and combed their hair without being told to, and spent hours chatting on the telephone (now a computer or handheld device) with the classic teenage boy's dreamy/dopey look on their face. Their parents would regard the phenomenon with a knowing and bemused expression as they told each other, “cherchez la femme.”
See also: femme, la
References in periodicals archive ?
The same suffix can form nouns of different grammatical genders: masculine, as in (13b); feminine, as in (14b); and common gender (MASC or FEM), as in (15b) and (16b).
To summarize both, the experiment and the FEM model have fulfilled their purpose: DIC can be used for Ioscipescu test and the FEM model represents the experiment.
As Equation 1 shows, the parameters A, m, and n were needed in FEM, and they were determined by using the short-term experimental creep data in different conditions, such as the temperature, humidity, and loading levels.
However, while specific industries are not a driver for FEM usage per se, the increasing range of physics domains has opened the floodgates, as Guna Krishna, vice president of product development at Altair, explained: ' Today, the FEM is used in many industries such as robotics to design motors, in computers to design chips and circuit boards, in biomedical applications to design heart valves, tooth implants, stents, in self-driving cars to locate the sensors, in manufacturing to reduce the number of defects, and improving the additive manufacturing process.'
Then, a comparison with the analytical, finite element method (FEM), and X-FEM methods was conducted.
Regarding the simulation of the tunnel advancement, the induced three-dimensional (3D) effects on the rockmass are simulated by applying the excavation-induced stresses as a distributed load on the excavation boundary for the FEM models, and the face replacement method [45] for the FDEM models.
The results of comparison between two different stator slot size which is 6mm and 8mm is described in many aspects from the simulation of FEM is shown below.
In the FEM region [[OMEGA].sub.FEM], the electric field satisfies the following Helmholtz's equation:
The FEM is one of the most widely used mesh-based methods in solving PDEs.
By using several numerical techniques, such as finite element method (FEM), finite volume method (FVM), and boundary element method (BEM), approximate solution for the MHD flow problems can be obtained.
Ju and Lin [11] used the FEM to calculate the vertical vibration of girders causing moving vehicle due to the braking force with simple model.
A finite element model (FEM) including the concrete cracking and the bond-slip was developed to simulate the nonlinear response of reinforced concrete structures.
The numerical method contains finite difference method (FDM), finite element method (FEM) [1], finite volume method (FVM) and boundary element methods (BEM).
The global automotive FEM market is estimated to be USD 89.75 billion in 2015, and is projected to reach USD 119.08 billion by 2020, growing at a CAGR of 5.82% from 2015 to 2020.
Finite element modeling (FEM) was used to study the AE type signals generated from internal dipole sources in a 600 mm long by 8.5 mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) rod.