fellow

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hail-fellow-well-met

Very friendly, often obnoxiously or disingenuously so. I don't think George is as nice as he seems—he just strikes me as hail-fellow-well-met.

a fellow traveler

Someone who identifies with or is sympathetic to the aims or ideology of a political movement or organization, but is not a formal or full member of it. Used especially in the 1950s in reference to those suspected of being communist sympathizers. In my grandfather's day, if someone accused you of being a fellow traveler, it was often to derail your career completely. Despite having a mark against him as a "fellow traveler," he still managed to remain at the Hollywood elite.
See also: fellow, traveler

regular fellow

A good-natured, dependable person. Oh, Sarah will certainly help you with that—she's a regular fellow. We're looking for a couple of regular fellows to help with our project this weekend.
See also: fellow, regular

regular guy

A good-natured, dependable man. Oh, Earl will certainly help you with that—he's a regular guy. We're looking for a couple of regular guys to help with our project this weekend.
See also: guy, regular

strange bedfellows

A pair of people, things, or groups connected in a certain situation or activity but extremely different in overall characteristics, opinions, ideologies, lifestyles, behaviors, etc. A notorious playboy musician and an ultra-conservative media pundit may be strange bedfellows, but the two are coming together all this month to bring a spotlight to suicide awareness. I thought that the two writers would make strange bedfellows, given the drastically different nature of their writing, but the books they've co-written actually work really well.
See also: bedfellow, strange

hale-fellow-well-met

Fig. friendly to everyone; falsely friendly to everyone. (Usually said of males.) Yes, he's friendly, sort of hale-fellow-well-met. He's not a very sincere person. Hail-fellow-well-met—you know the type. What a pain he is. Good old Mr. Hail-fellow-well-met. What a phony!

regular guy

a normal and dependable guy. Don't worry about Tom. He's a regular guy. He won't give you any trouble.
See also: guy, regular

regular guy

Also, regular fellow. A nice or agreeable person, as in Luke's a regular guy, or Hilda's a regular fellow. [Colloquial; first half of 1800s]
See also: guy, regular

strange bedfellows

A peculiar alliance or combination, as in George and Arthur really are strange bedfellows, sharing the same job but totally different in their views . Although strictly speaking bedfellows are persons who share a bed, like husband and wife, the term has been used figuratively since the late 1400s. This particular idiom may have been invented by Shakespeare in The Tempest (2:2), "Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows." Today a common extension is politics makes strange bedfellows, meaning that politicians form peculiar associations so as to win more votes. A similar term is odd couple, a pair who share either housing or a business but are very different in most ways. This term gained currency with Neil Simon's Broadway play The Odd Couple and, even more, with the motion picture (1968) and subsequent television series based on it, contrasting housemates Felix and Oscar, one meticulously neat and obsessively punctual, the other extremely messy and casual.
See also: bedfellow, strange

a fellow traveller

A fellow traveller is someone who supports the aims of an organization but is not a member of it. Note: `Traveller' is spelled `traveler' in American English. Although something of a critical fellow traveller, Sampson was very interested in the party.
See also: fellow, traveller

hail-fellow-well-met

showing excessive familiarity.
1979 Steven Levenkron The Best Little Girl in the World Harold was accustomed to hail-fellow-well-met salesmen and deferential secretaries and even irate accountants.

a/the ˈdevil of a job, nuisance, fellow, etc.

(old-fashioned) a difficult or an unpleasant example of something: We’re going to have a devil of a job getting the roots of that tree out of the ground.
See also: devil, of

hail fellow well met

On easy, congenial terms; also, superficial friendliness. This expression, which has a quintessentially Victorian ring, actually dates from the sixteenth century. Presumably it began as a greeting, but by 1550 it was being used figuratively and so appeared in Thomas Becon’s New Catechisme (“They would be ‘hail fellow well met’ with him”).
See also: fellow, hail, met, well

strange bedfellows

An odd couple; a peculiar combination. Shakespeare appears to have originated the term, with his “Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows” (The Tempest, 2.2). Several centuries later, Edward Bulwer-Lytton wrote (The Caxtons, 1849), “Poverty has strange bedfellows.” Today we often say that politics makes strange bedfellows, meaning that politicians form odd associations in order to win more support or votes.
See also: bedfellow, strange

fellow traveler

Someone sympathetic to the beliefs and activities of an organization but not a member of that group. The phrase originally applied to people in the early days of the Soviet Union who supported the Russian revolution and the Communist Party but were not members. Communism was popular among many American intellectuals during the 1930s and '40s, but following World War II, this country's attitude toward the Soviets changed in light of Stalin's purges and revelations of espionage. Accusations that Soviet sympathizers had infiltrated our government and military led to congressional investigations, and the phrase “fellow traveler” was used to label those accused of “un-American” activities or even just “Communist dupes.” Many such people found themselves blacklisted or otherwise persecuted. A rarely used vestige of the phrase now applies to anyone who agrees with any viewpoint or faction but does not publicly work for it. The Soviet Union named its early space satellites “Sputnik,” the Russian word for “fellow traveler.”
See also: fellow, traveler
References in periodicals archive ?
"As for the title, I don't know where it would go beyond George, but let's hope he gets through the war and has children of his own," Fellowes said.
While it is all systems go for a shot at the six-furlong Listed prize, Fellowes has warned he would not run Wet Sail should the ground be fast.
"The contract covers a period of 120 days, with an option to extend for another 180 days," Fellowes asserted.
Lord Fellowes said: "It's for NBC Universal and it will happen when Downton finishes because I just couldn't do both at once.
Speaking about the recent departure of actor Dan Stevens from the show, 63-year-old Fellowes said: "It had to happen.
[The show] certainly ought to have an Indian character from that period," Fellowes told The Telegraph.
Advertising aside, Fellowes' newest consumer model does address some practical issues.
In contrast, Newman devotes just a few words to Jessica Fellowes' book--which is listed on the first page of the review as a title that will be discussed--and tells readers nothing about the author; even neglecting to mention that Jessica Fellowes is the niece of Downton Abbey's creator, Julian Fellowes.
Among the British Emmy winners were Kate Winslet (main) and series Downton Abbey (inset, writer Julian Fellowes)
Fellowes, the drama's writer and executive producer, had lashed out at those highlighting the inaccuracies, saying: "The real problem is with people who are insecure socially."
SCORES of people last night turned out at the British Club to pay their respects to former Bahrain resident Mary Hamilton Fellowes, 59, who died last month following a lengthy fight against cancer.
Another key member of the creative team on the show, which settles into Birmingham Hippodrome tomorrow night for a two-month run, is actor and writer Julian Fellowes, who has contributed the book - that peculiar-tomusicals term which basically means the overall dramatic structure and the dialogue which links the musical numbers - to Cameron Mackintosh and Disney's latest blockbuster.
Estate agent Tom Birch, of agents Mansfield Fellowes, Roath, said: "It is an exceptional apartment and very big.
Initially it was a lucky search on the internet that brought the two companies together and Peter Fellowes, managing director of The Vending Revolution, could not be happier with the choice he made to produce his "Snack-a-Can" concept.
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