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bacon-fed

obsolete Fat and of greasy complexion. Used by the character Falstaff in Shakespeare's Henry IV, referring to the "bacon-fed knaves" whom he is about to rob. Those slovenly, bacon-fed men who feed their faces till near bursting fill me with disgust.

feed the fishes

slang To drown. Primarily heard in UK. We've got a search party out there right now, but I'm getting more and more worried about some of our guys feeding the fishes. If you can't swim, it's only a matter of time till you feed the fishes!
See also: feed, Fishes

be fed up to the back teeth

slang To be bored or annoyed with a persistent issue. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I'm fed up to the back teeth with this weather—will it ever stop raining? We're all fed up to the back teeth with your constant complaining, Marge!
See also: back, fed, teeth, up

be spoon-fed

1. Literally, to have food inserted into one's mouth by another person. My mother had to be spoon-fed for a while after her stroke. No, my daughter is off the bottle now—she's spoon-fed.
2. By extension, to be helped excessively by someone else (usually to the recipient's detriment). Those students are lazy because they are always spoon-fed the answers by their teacher. The actress got so flustered in front of the camera that she had to be spoon-fed her lines. How unprofessional!

fed up (with someone or something)

Irritated, exasperated, bored, or disgusted with someone or something. I'm getting really fed up listening to all your complaining! My wife is fed up with our car, but we just can't afford a new one.
See also: fed, someone, up

feed (one) a line

1. To tell an actor what to say. In this usage, the phrase is often used in the plural ("feed one (one's) lines"), and "line" refers to a line of dialogue in the script. I'm sorry, I can't remember a word of this scene—can someone please feed me my lines?
2. To speak deceptively to one. In this usage, "line" refers to a prepared response, perhaps one intended to be what the listener wants to hear. Don't feed me a line, tell me the truth—what's the real reason you missed my party?
See also: feed, line

fed up to the back teeth (with someone or something)

Bored or annoyed with someone or something. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I'm fed up to the back teeth with this weather—will it ever stop raining? We're all fed up to the back teeth with your constant complaining, Marge!
See also: back, fed, someone, teeth, up

fed up to the teeth

Bored or annoyed with someone or something. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I'm fed up to the teeth with this weather—will it ever stop raining? We're all fed up to the teeth with your constant complaining, Marge!
See also: fed, teeth, up

fed to the gills

Irritated, exasperated, bored, or disgusted with someone or something. I'm getting really fed to the gills listening to all your complaining! My wife is fed to the gills with our car, but we just can't afford a new one.
See also: fed, gill

fed to the teeth

slang Bored or annoyed with someone or something. I'm fed to the teeth with this weather—will it ever stop raining? We're all fed to the teeth with your constant complaining, Marge!
See also: fed, teeth

feed (one's) face

slang To eat a lot of food, especially quickly and in a short period of time. I have to leave for my four-hour meeting in 15 minutes, and I don't want to be hungry later, so I need to feed my face real quick before I head out. Sorry, I'm not hungry for dinner—I really fed my face at the luncheon earlier.
See also: face, feed

feed the kitty

To give money to a collection or pool. (A "kitty" is such a collection of money.) Once everyone has fed the kitty, I'll deal the next hand.
See also: feed, kitty

cornfed

Unsophisticated due to being from a rural locale (where corn would be a common staple); hickish. Can someone help this cornfed guy navigate the subway system?

the Fed

An informal shortening of "The Federal Reserve" or "the Federal Reserve System" the central banking system of the United States. Primarily heard in US. The Fed has said it will not raise interest rates this year in an attempt to stabilize the economy. Inflation is expected to increase 2.3%—significantly higher than the Fed's prediction in December.
See also: fed

the feds

Any federal agency, or the individual agents thereof, responsible for enforcing laws regarding drugs, taxes, immigration, etc. Primarily heard in US. The massive amounts of money coming in and out of the company's accounts attracted the attention of the feds, who suspected they might be involved in money laundering. It turned out the drug dealer had been working as an informant for the feds for years, supplying information on rival gangs and distributors around the country. As soon as this becomes a hostage situation, the feds will take over.
See also: fed

feed (something) back into (something)

To try to re-insert something into a machine. Good luck feeding that paper back into the printer—that thing seems to have a mind of its own!
See also: back, feed

feed into (something)

1. Literally, to insert or input something into something, such as a machine. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "feed" and "into." I fed a dollar bill into the vending machine and contemplated my options. Have you fed the data into the machine yet?
2. To empty into another body of water, as of a river, tributary, etc.. Does this river really feed into the ocean?
3. To contribute, relate, or segue into something. Your worrying just feeds into my own anxiety about performing, so please stop talking! Paul's comment actually feeds nicely into the next part of today's lecture.
See also: feed

feed (something) to (someone or an animal)

1. Literally, to give food to someone or an animal. Don't worry, I already fed dinner to the kids. Have you fed dry food to the cat today?
2. To tell to someone something that is untrue. If you keep feeding Mom and Dad lies, they're gonna be furious when they inevitably find out the truth.
See also: feed

*fed up (to some degree) (with someone or something)

bored or disgusted with someone or something. (*Typically: be ~; become ~.) I am fed up to my eyeballs with your complaining. I am just fed up to here!
See also: fed, up

feed the kitty

Fig. to contribute money. (A kitty here is a small collection of money.) Please feed the kitty. Make a contribution to help sick children. Come on, Bill. Feed the kitty. You can afford a dollar for a good cause.
See also: feed, kitty

I'm (really) fed up (with someone or something).

Fig. I have had enough of someone or something. Something must be done. Tom: This place is really dull. John: Yeah. I'm fed up with it. I'm out of here! Sally: Can't you do anything right? Bill: I'm really fed up with your complaining! You're always picking on me!
See also: fed, up

fed to the gills

Also, fed to the teeth; fed up. Disgusted, unable or unwilling to put up with something. For example, I'm fed to the gills with these delays (the gills here is slang for "mouth"), or He was fed to the teeth with her excuses, or I'm fed up-let's leave right now. Of these colloquial expressions, fed up, alluding to being overfull from having overeaten, dates from about 1900, and the others from the first half of the 1900s. Also see up to one's ears.
See also: fed, gill

feed the kitty

Contribute money to a pool or reserve, as in I can't make a big donation this year, but I'm willing to feed the kitty something. This term, originating in gambling, incorporates a pun, since kitty can mean "cat" as well as "pool." [Late 1800s]
See also: feed, kitty

fed up to the back teeth

or

sick to the back teeth

BRITISH
If you are fed up to the back teeth with something or sick to the back teeth with it, you are very annoyed or bored by it because it has been happening for a long time. The public are fed up to the back teeth with the bad behaviour of a tiny minority of fans. It is clear that Sharon is sick to the back teeth with questions about her private life.
See also: back, fed, teeth, up

fed up to the teeth (or back teeth)

extremely annoyed.
See also: fed, teeth, up

feed the fishes

1 be dead from drowning. 2 vomit over the side of a boat. informal
See also: feed, Fishes

ˌfed up to the back ˈteeth with somebody/something

(also ˌsick to the back ˈteeth of somebody/something) (informal) depressed, annoyed or bored by somebody/something: I’m fed up to the back teeth with listening to you complaining.She’s always playing the same CD, and I’m sick to the back teeth of it!

cornfed

mod. rural; backward; unsophisticated. I enjoy her honest, cornfed humor.

fed

1. and the feds n. a federal agent concerned with narcotics, tax collection, customs, etc. Some fed was prowling around asking questions about you.
2. and The Fed n. the Federal Reserve Board. (Colloquial. Usually Fed. Always with the in this sense.) The Fed is not likely to raise interest rates very soon again.

the feds

verb
See fed
See also: fed

The Fed

verb
See fed
See also: fed

fed to the gills

Thoroughly disgusted. This American version of the earlier British fed to the (back) teeth and fed (up) to the eyelids is based on the slang meaning of gills for the human mouth.
See also: fed, gill