fat cat

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fat cat

A disparaging term for a rich and powerful person. The voters were tired of all the fat cats running for political office. They wanted someone who understood the plight of the middle class.
See also: cat, fat

fat-cat

1. noun Someone who is very wealthy and successful. That guy is a really fat-cat in Hollywood, so we definitely have to impress him if we want to get our movie made.
2. adjective Describing such a person or the condition of being wealthy and successful. That's a fat-cat kind of house—something we middle-class people can only dream about.

fat cat

Fig. someone who is ostentatiously and smugly wealthy. I like to watch the fat cats go by in their BMWs. I'm no fat cat. I can't even pay my normal bills!
See also: cat, fat

fat cat

A wealthy and privileged person, as in This neighborhood, with its million-dollar estates, is full of fat cats. This term originally meant "a rich contributor to a political campaign," and while this usage persists, it now is often applied more broadly, as in the example. [Colloquial; 1920s]
See also: cat, fat

a fat cat

COMMON You call a businessperson or politician a fat cat when you disapprove of the way they use their wealth and power because it seems unfair or wrong to you. These fat cats of commerce make huge profits out of the public. Yet again privatisation benefits City fat cats at the expense of the customer. Note: You can also use fat cat before a noun. The taxpayer will be left to pay while the fat cat businessmen get the cream of Britain's rail services. He promised to end fat-cat salaries for union bosses and increase worker wages.
See also: cat, fat

a ˈfat cat

(informal, disapproving) a person who earns, or has, a lot of money (especially when compared to people who do not earn much): The company director is described as a fat cat, who enjoys his luxury lifestyle but doesn’t care about his employees.
See also: cat, fat

fat cat

A wealthy individual. This rhyming term, originating in America about 1920, once had a more specific meaning, that is, a rich individual who made large contributions to a political party or campaign. Later it was extended to any wealthy person, as well as an individual who has become lazy or smug as the result of material assets. Thus, an article in the Saturday Review of Literature in 1949, “Hollywood celebrities, literary fat cats.” In a still more generalized sense, the New York Times headlined a column about the financial situation and the administration’s reaction to it “In the New Populism Add the Government to the List of ‘Fat Cats’” (June 17, 2010). See also deep pockets.
See also: cat, fat
References in periodicals archive ?
In 11 years the bar company that started in Bangor has become one of the hottest new operators in the hospitality business, and Simon Patterson, who still runs the Fat Cat with Matthew Saunders, says they intend to keep on growing.
When it pops, they've won anyway, Because we all have to pay, To keep on feathering the fat cats' lairs.
Fat Cats Caf Bar represents an ideal purchase for a first-time buyer, as no specific training or experience is required.
Waiting lists for Rolls-Royces are growing longer as super-rich financiers spend their windfalls and the price of farm land is soaring as the fat cats snap up country retreats.
FAT CAT advisers have cost the NHS a staggering pounds 25BILLION - or pounds 1,000 for every family in Britain.
Exactly what the fat cats are after, it seems to me.
DRUGS giant GlaxoSmithKline was facing the prospect of an shareholder revolt today over "fat cat" pay.
Yasheng Huang of the Harvard Business School points out that much of China's capitalist class consists not of corporate fat cats but of peasants, because the rural populace was allowed more freedom to experiment than were city dwellers who posed a threat to China's state-owned enterprises.
STOPPING the fat cats getting the cream was widely expected of Labour when it took office in 1997.
Bankers and insurance fat cats will only be allowed to sit on a maximum of three boards to reduce potential conflicts of interest.
MR APPLEBY gets into an abusive mode in his first sentence with his 'fat cats of polluting industries' as a description of those who are not convinced of the claimed man-made element of global warming.
Far from comprising a vast army of fat cats, many parts of the public sector have been under direct gover nmental attack for year s.
I'M as anxious as anyone to see the fat cats brought low but I think we're beginning to confuse them with other people who are certainly not grinding the faces of the poor.
"Plump felines became fat cats some years ago - now they are dangerously obese.
Yet NHS fat cats are making fools out of all of us by pocketing whacking salaries yet failing to deliver a health service fit for the 21st Century.