fantastic

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trip the light fantastic

To dance. Taken from the John Milton poem L'Allegro: "Come and trip it as ye go / On the light fantastic toe." Of course, the best part of a wedding is when everyone trips the light fantastic into the wee hours of the morning.
See also: fantastic, light, trip

trip the light fantastic

Jocular to dance. Shall we go trip the light fantastic?
See also: fantastic, light, trip

trip the light fantastic

Dance, as in Let's go out tonight and trip the light fantastic. This expression was originated by John Milton in L'Allegro (1632): "Come and trip it as ye go, On the light fantastick toe." The idiom uses trip in the sense of "a light, tripping step," and although fantastick was never the name of any particular dance, it survived and was given revived currency in James W. Blake's immensely popular song, The Sidewalks of New York (1894).
See also: fantastic, light, trip

trip the light fantastic

dance. humorous
This expression comes from the invitation to dance in John Milton 's poem ‘L'Allegro’ ( 1645 ): ‘Come, and trip it as ye go On the light fantastic toe’.
See also: fantastic, light, trip

trip the light fantastic

To dance.
See also: fantastic, light, trip

trip the light fantastic, to

To dance. This locution was coined by John Milton, who wrote, “Come, and trip it as ye go, On the light fantastick toe” (“L’Allegro,” 1632). For some reason it caught on (although fantastick was not then, and never became, the name of a particular dance). James W. Blake used it in the lyrics to a very popular Gay Nineties song, “The Sidewalks of New York” (1894): “We tripped the light fantastic—On the sidewalks of New York.”
See also: light, trip

trip the light fantastic

Dance. The phrase comes from John Milton's poem “L'Allegro”: “Come and trip it as ye go / On the light fantastic toe.” “Trip” did not mean to stub your toe and fall. On the contrary it meant “to move lightly and nimbly.”
See also: fantastic, light, trip
References in classic literature ?
He longed to see the curious table-napkins wrought for the Priest of the Sun, on which were displayed all the dainties and viands that could be wanted for a feast; the mortuary cloth of King Chilperic, with its three hundred golden bees; the fantastic robes that excited the indignation of the Bishop of Pontus and were figured with "lions, panthers, bears, dogs, forests, rocks, hunters--all, in fact, that a painter can copy from nature"; and the coat that Charles of Orleans once wore, on the sleeves of which were embroidered the verses of a song beginning "Madame, je suis tout joyeux," the musical accompaniment of the words being wrought in gold thread, and each note, of square shape in those days, formed with four pearls.
What of George Willoughby, with his powdered hair and fantastic patches?
If anything were to happen (though indeed I don't believe in it and think you quite incapable of it), yet in case you were taken during these forty or fifty hours with the notion of putting an end to the business in some other way, in some fantastic fashion--laying hands on yourself--(it's an absurd proposition, but you must forgive me for it) do leave a brief but precise note, only two lines, and mention the stone.
"Curious anomaly, fantastic element!" said an ingenious naturalist, "in which the animal kingdom blossoms, and the vegetable does not!"
But only for a moment they hesitated, and then with one accord they again took up their fantastic advance upon their prey; but even then a sudden crashing in the jungle behind them brought them once more to a halt, and as they turned to look in the direction of this new noise there broke upon their startled visions a sight that may well have frozen the blood of braver men than the Wagambi.
In one interview lasting about two minutes,I counted seven fantastics.
If star is the most overused word, second place must surely go to fantastic to describe anything or anyone slightly above mediocre.
Fantastic replaced fabulous (or fab) about 10 years a go.
Roll on the end of the age of fantastic. Even the most modest dictionary will supply a welter of alternatives.
Groups of men, crossdressing, who called themselves the Fantastics or Fantasticals, masqueraded on Thanksgiving beginning in the 1780s.
An editorial in a Pennsylvania newspaper in 1870 defended the Fantastics, on the grounds that "it is better to be merry than sad, and if, as some genial writer asserts, a good hearty laugh takes a nail out of your coffin, a parade of the fantasticals can not fail to lessen the bills of mortality."(19) The New York Times in 1885 regarded the Fantastics as "hilarious" and "quaint."(20) In New York City the police and an occasional politician joined the parade.
A broader attack on the Fantastics began in these years as well.
* In honor of its 30th anniversary, Fantastic Sams aims to break its record for charitable giving, according to company executives.
For the past three years, Fantastic Sams has partnered with Locks of Love, a national non-profit organization that helps hundreds of financially disadvantaged children who suffer from long-term medical hair loss by providing them with custom-fitted hairpieces.
This year, Fantastic Sams' more than 1,300 franchises worldwide will pull together as "Fantastic Friends" to bring that total to $30,000 and 10,000 ponytails for Locks of Love.