familiarity breeds contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

Repeated exposure to someone or something often creates a contentious relationship. A: "Those two teams have built up quite a rivalry over the years." B: "They play in the same division, and familiarity breeds contempt." I've been stuck with Larry in the office all week, and I'm afraid they're right that familiary breeds contempt.
See also: breed, contempt

Familiarity breeds contempt.

Prov. People do not respect someone they know well enough to know his or her faults. The movie star doesn't let anyone get to know him, because he knows that familiarity breeds contempt.
See also: breed, contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

Long experience of someone or something can make one so aware of the faults as to be scornful. For example, Ten years at the same job and now he hates it-familiarity breeds contempt. The idea is much older, but the first recorded use of this expression was in Chaucer's Tale of Melibee (c. 1386).
See also: breed, contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

If you say that familiarity breeds contempt, you mean that if you know someone or something very well, you can easily become bored with them and stop treating them with respect. Of course, it's often true that familiarity breeds contempt, that we're attracted to those who seem so different from those we know at home. It is second-year drivers — when familiarity breeds contempt for road rules — that are the problem. Note: Other nouns are sometimes used instead of contempt. Familiarity breeds inattention. Typically, family members are so convinced they know what another family member is going to say that they don't bother to listen.
See also: breed, contempt

familiarity breeds conˈtempt

(saying) you have little respect, liking, etc. for somebody/something that you know too well: George’s father is regarded by everyone as a great artist, but George doesn’t think he is. Familiarity breeds contempt!
See also: breed, contempt

familiarity breeds contempt

Overexposure to or knowing something or someone too thoroughly can turn liking into hostility. The idea behind this expression dates from ancient times—the Roman writer Publilius Syrus used it about 43 b.c.—and approximately twelve hundred years later Pope Innocent III repeated it, also in Latin. The first record of it in English appeared in Nicholas Udall’s translation of Erasmus’s sayings (1548): “Familiaritye bringeth contempt.” Later writers often stated it with humor or irony, notably Mark Twain in his unpublished diaries (Notebooks, ca. 1900): “Familiarity breeds contempt—and children.”
See also: breed, contempt
References in classic literature ?
As they by no means improved on better acquaintance, and as familiarity breeds contempt, he resolved to banish them from his thoughts by dint of hard walking.
Familiarity breeds contempt; I have made myself too cheap.
In his view, some of the officers had unduly overstayed and needed to be posted elsewhere, because familiarity breeds contempt.
Familiarity breeds contempt, goes another ancient axiom.
If familiarity breeds contempt then it's no wonder everyone in Scottish football is feuding like a family in the last few days of a fortnight at Butlins.
It is said that familiarity breeds contempt, but for Kevin Belingon it creates hunger.
Howe writes: "Everything ceases to be wonderful the moment we get used to it." A popular version of this is "Familiarity breeds contempt." Or, as one cynic says: "Familiarity breeds attempt."
They say "familiarity breeds contempt," and that probably captures my perception of the Orion Nebula (S&T: Dec.
Leigh Hunt, principal horticultural advisor at the Royal Horticultural Society, says: "Robust everyday shrubs are the humdrum wallpaper in the urban environment and it seems that in the case of some of the more well-known varieties, familiarity breeds contempt.
IF familiarity breeds contempt, then tensions between Waterford and Clare players will be rising steadily.
THEY say that familiarity breeds contempt and nowhere is that more obvious than on our roads.
"Familiarity breeds contempt.'' If the old adage is true, then the expensive television political spots are a waste of money.
Yeah, I know, but "Familiarity breeds contempt." Familiarity also brings ...
In school, as in any other walk of life, familiarity breeds contempt. A good teacher can't be a pupil's best mate.
Bruce, 53, added: "The problem is familiarity breeds contempt and that's maybe the case with Arsene now.