fall out

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fall out

1. verb Literally, to drop or tumble out of something. My phone fell out of my bag last night, and I couldn't find it in the dark.
2. verb To occur, result, or arise. What fell out of your meeting with the boss?
3. verb To leave a particular place, often in a military formation. All right troops, fall out! I have to be up at 6 AM tomorrow, so it's time for me to fall out.
4. verb To be revealed, often unexpectedly or by accident. In our meeting, it fell out that she's planning to resign soon—can you believe it?
5. verb To have one's relationship with someone completely diminished, typically due to an argument or unpleasant incident. Apparently, Gina fell out with Dave last week, and now they're not talking to each other at all.
6. verb Of teeth, to loosen and fall from one's gums. My daughter is so excited that her two front teeth have fallen out.
7. noun The results or consequences of something. When used as a noun, the phrase is usually written as one word. I suspect their displeasure is the fallout from last week's meeting about limiting vacation time, sir.
See also: fall, out

fall out (with someone) (over something)

 and fall out (with someone) (about someone or something)
to quarrel or disagree with someone about something. Tony fell out with Nick about the video game. Bill fell out with Sally over the question of buying a new car. Bill fell out with John about who would sleep on the bottom bunk.
See also: fall, out

fall out

 
1. to happen; to result. As things fell out, we had a wonderful trip. What fell out of our discussion was a decision to continue.
2. to leave one's place in a formation when dismissed. (Usually in scouting or the military. The opposite of fall in.) The scouts fell out and ran to the campfire. All the soldiers fell out and talked among themselves.
3. to depart. It's late, George. I have to fall out. Let's fall out. I have to get up early in the morning.
See also: fall, out

fall out

(of something) to topple out of something. Mary fell out of the tree and hurt herself.
See also: fall, out

fall out

1. Leave one's place in military ranks, as in After inspection they were ordered to fall out. [First half of 1800s]
2. Also, have a falling-out. Disagree, quarrel, as in The brothers fell out over their inheritance, or They no longer speak-they had a falling-out some years ago. [First half of 1500s]
3. Happen, result, as in Let us know how it falls out in the end. [Second half of 1500s]
See also: fall, out

fall out

v.
1. To drop from something: I accidentally knocked my toolbox over and all of my nails fell out.
2. To come out of place. Used of teeth: When I was 12, my last baby tooth fell out. If you don't get your cavity filled, your tooth will fall out!
3. To occur as a natural consequence; turn out: These results fall out directly from the experimental evidence.
4. To come or be revealed to be known, especially by chance: Over the course of their conversation, it fell out that they had all once lived in Chicago.
5. To break a relationship or form a negative relationship as a result of a dispute: The siblings fell out over the inheritance. The law firm was disbanded after the partners fell out.
6. fall out with To break a relationship or form a negative relationship with someone: After John fell out with Alice, they sold their house.
See also: fall, out

fall out

in. to depart. (Probably from the military command meaning disperse.) Let’s fall out. I have to get up early in the morning.
See also: fall, out

fallout

n. the results of something; the flack from something. The fallout from this afternoon’s meeting was not as serious as some expected.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I'm dishing it out in training again when it comes to tackles and to be honest I've had a few fall-outs with the boys.
The paper quoted sources, as saying that the PPP is eyeing the PML-N's support on the RGST, as not just being significant to control political fall-outs, but also to put the country on the track of self-reliance, a point being agitated quite vociferously by Nawaz and his party.
Today the ECHO carries a special report about the recent surge in shootings across Merseyside, which were apparently sparked by tit-for-tat fall-outs.
On "further fall-outs" there has and never will be any "fall outs" via Redcar & Cleveland Borough Council with Middlesbrough or any other Tees Valley authority.
Despite the fall-outs, the group won a place in the final rounds of the talent show - becoming one of the final six group acts.
Players have fall-outs with referees and team-mates all the time - and most of them just accept it and move on.
Her recent romantic dramas have been splashed across the tabloid pages AND she's had well-publicised fall-outs with fellow presenters like Eamonn Holmes.
The two, hour-long shows feature all the usual glitz and glamour, fall-outs and fisticuffs, with OMG moments galore.
The frequent fall-outs between Brown and Blair were hardly a secret - but few suspected the hostilities ran so deep.
Set a cleaning rota - chores are another major source of fall-outs between housemates.
There's no time now for any further fall-outs between the authorities.
It is legitimate to ask: Have the high profile fall-outs and failures of the past 18 months - some personal, others relating to the city's lack of focus and good management in key aspects of Capital of Culture and more general town hall finances - debilitated the Lib Dems' ability to continue with credibility?
Tyler has reportedly been unhappy at Sky for some time after fall-outs with management.
Staff fall-outs, punch-ups, drunken rants at the boss and alcohol-related vomiting are common features of a works party these days.
Hatton admitted: "Fall-outs are almost part and parcel of boxing, but not when it starts to get personal.