F-word


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F-word

n. the word fuck. (A euphemism that can be used to refer to the word alone without reference to the various meanings of the word.) They said the F-word seven times in the movie we saw last night.
References in periodicals archive ?
But using the F-word, the first on a PG-13 TV show, did not go down well with fans.
Feminism: Reinventing the F-Word captures the interest of the reader with engaging text, quotes, pictures, and side blurbs.
Initially, Made Television (Made TVL) argued that the company complied with the code but that the use of the f-word was an oversight.
The family has now made another video in which they get her to say that she would never use the F-word again.
An inverse relationship was expected been perceived offensiveness and reported usage, whereby participants were expected to report the lowest usage of the n-word, moderate usage of the f-word, and relatively high usage of the word a-hole.
Last week, I took up the invitation to take the F-Word to the Glasgow International Comedy Festival, alongside mostly stand-ups.
Just after 1pm followers of Mayor Anderson's official mayoral Twitter account @joeforliverpool were left stunned after the message which used the F-word and urged the London hosts not to mess up the city's hosting of the sporting spectacle.
The F-Word, a public Internet site, has been accessible to people of all genders.
You do hear the odd F-word but let's be honest, from time to time, we have all used it.
I WAS delighted to see that somebody has at last had the guts to stand up to bullying celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay in The F-Word.
I don't just mean mild swearing, there was constant repetition of the F-word, which I'm afraid I find totally unacceptable.
Summary: An Australian man faces three years in prison for using the f-word.
The show, based on the chef's Kitchen Nightmares series, contained 115 uses of the the F-word in just 40 minutes.
Using interview research and polling data taken from a vast number of sources, The F-Word takes the temperature of contemporary feminism in the United States, revealing that many of the same concerns that were relevant 30 years ago remain at the forefront of women's minds.
On second thought, that does qualify as a rebuke, but it contains an acknowledgement that there's an easy solution: The FCC should return to the kind of level-headed treatment of "fleeting expletives" that it employed in reviewing U2 lead singer Bono's exuberant use of the f-word during a live broadcast of the 2003 Golden Globe Awards.