extent

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to a certain extent

Somewhat; partly; in a limited way or to a limited degree. Your essay would be improved to a certain extent by tidying up your paragraphs, but your topic on the whole has some fundamental problems. Our administration is willing to negotiate to a certain extent, but we aren't ready to make any significant changes to the legislation.
See also: certain, extent, to

to a degree

Somewhat; partly; in a limited way or to a limited degree. Your essay would be improved to a degree by tidying up your paragraphs, but your topic on the whole has some fundamental problems. Our administration is willing to negotiate to a degree, but we aren't ready to make any significant changes to the legislation.
See also: degree, to

to a great extent

To a large or significant degree; greatly; a lot. While I agree with the chairman's points to a great extent, there are a few details that I think bear closer scrutiny. The economic collapse was caused to a great extent by the rise in the lending of subprime mortgages.
See also: extent, great, to

to a large extent

To a great or significant degree; greatly; a lot. While I agree with the chairman's points to a large extent, there are a few details that I think bear closer scrutiny. The economic collapse was caused to a large extent by the rise in the lending of subprime mortgages.
See also: extent, large, to

to a limited extent

Somewhat; partly; in a limited way. Your essay would be improved to a limited extent by tidying up your paragraphs, but your topic on the whole has some fundamental problems. The administration is willing to negotiate to a limited extent, but it is not ready to make any significant changes to the legislation.
See also: extent, limited, to

to an extent

Somewhat; partly; in a limited way or to a limited degree. Your essay would be improved to an extent by tidying up your paragraphs, but your topic on the whole has some fundamental problems. Our administration is willing to negotiate to an extent, but we aren't ready to make any significant changes to the legislation.
See also: extent, to

to some degree

Somewhat; partly; in a limited way or to a limited extent. Your essay would be improved to some degree by tidying up your paragraphs, but your topic on the whole has some fundamental problems. The administration is willing to negotiate to some degree, but it is not ready to make any significant changes to the legislation.
See also: degree, to

to some extent

Somewhat; partly; in a limited way or to a limited degree. Your essay would be improved to some extent by tidying up your paragraphs, but your topic on the whole has some fundamental problems. The administration is willing to negotiate to some extent but it is not ready to make any significant changes to the legislation.
See also: extent, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

to a great extent

Cliché mainly; largely. To a great extent, Mary is the cause of her own problems. I've finished my work to a great extent. There is nothing important left to do.
See also: extent, great, to

to some extent

to some degree; in some amount; partly. I've solved this problem to some extent. I can help you understand this to some extent.
See also: extent, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

to a degree

Also, to an extent. See to some degree.
See also: degree, to

to some degree

Also, to a certain degree; to some or a certain extent ; to a degree or an extent . Somewhat, in a way, as in To some degree we'll have to compromise, or To an extent it's a matter of adjusting to the colder climate. The use of degree in these terms, all used in the same way, dates from the first half of the 1700s, and extent from the mid-1800s.
See also: degree, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

to...extent

used to show how far something is true or how great an effect it has: To a certain extent, we are all responsible for this tragic situation.He had changed to such an extent (= so much) that I no longer recognized him.The pollution of the forest has seriously affected plant life and, to a lesser extent, wildlife.To what extent is this true of all schools?
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

to a degree

To a small extent; in a limited way: doesn't like spicy food, but can eat a little pepper to a degree.
See also: degree, to
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
D'Artagnan recognized the king; he saw him fix his melancholy look upon the immense extent of the waters, and absorb upon his pale countenance the red rays of the sun already cut by the black line of the horizon.
Yet such was the force of example that the village young men, who had not hastened to enter the gate while no intruder was in the way, now dropped in quickly, and soon the couples became leavened with rustic youth to a marked extent, till at length the plainest woman in the club was no longer compelled to foot it on the masculine side of the figure.
"'It was just after this adventure that we encountered a continent of immense extent and prodigious solidity, but which, nevertheless, was supported entirely upon the back of a sky-blue cow that had no fewer than four hundred horns.'"
Another of these magi constructed (of like material) a creature that put to shame even the genius of him who made it; for so great were its reasoning powers that, in a second, it performed calculations of so vast an extent that they would have required the united labor of fifty thousand fleshy men for a year.
"'Another of these magicians, by means of a fluid that nobody ever yet saw, could make the corpses of his friends brandish their arms, kick out their legs, fight, or even get up and dance at his will.{*28} Another had cultivated his voice to so great an extent that he could have made himself heard from one end of the world to the other.{*29} Another had so long an arm that he could sit down in Damascus and indite a letter at Bagdad -- or indeed at any distance whatsoever.
Perfection of loveliness, they say, is in the direct ratio of the extent of this lump.