exception

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be the exception that proves the rule

To contradict a rule and thus confirm that the rule exists. A: "We're always told to get eight hours of sleep, but I usually feel really groggy when I sleep that much." B: "Well, I guess you're the exception that proves the rule."
See also: exception, prove, rule, that

make an exception

To allow someone or something to forego or bypass a usual rule, law, or standard. Often followed by "for (someone)." I usually don't let students hand in any assignments late, but considering the recent circumstances with your family, I'm willing to make an exception. We have to be firm with our rules for the kids—if we keep making exceptions like this, they won't take us seriously.
See also: exception, make

take exception

To strongly disagree with or take offense at something. If that's what you're saying, then yes, I take exception. Excuse me, but I take exception to being characterized as some sort of opportunist, just because I happened to make some good investments before the economy collapsed.
See also: exception, take

take exception to (something)

To strongly disagree with or take offense at something. Excuse me, but I take exception to being characterized as some sort of opportunist, just because I happened to make some good investments before the economy collapsed. I know she takes exception to the way the newspaper represented the data from her study.
See also: exception, take, to

the exception proves the rule

That which contradicts or goes against a supposed rule therefore proves that it is almost always true. A: "Video games are all just mindless filth that rots kids' brains." B: "I don't know, a lot of them let kids express themselves creatively or learn about the world in new ways." A: "Bah, the exceptions just prove the rule."
See also: exception, prove, rule

the exception that proves the rule

That which contradicts or goes against a supposed rule, and therefore proves it in one's mind. A: "Video games are all just mindless filth that rots kids' brains." B: "I don't know, a lot of them let kids express themselves creatively or learn about the world in new ways." A: "Bah, those are just the exceptions that prove the rule."
See also: exception, prove, rule, that

there is an exception to every rule

proverb Rules are not as clear, permanent, and unchanging as they may seem. A: "I'm so relieved that the principal has not punished my daughter for missing more days of school than school policy allows." B: "Well, she was very sick. There is an exception to every rule." As much as I try to remind her that there is an exception to every rule, my grandmother remains totally inflexible.
See also: every, exception, rule, there, to

with the exception of

With the exclusion of a particular thing. I really enjoy my new job, with the exception of the long hours.
See also: exception, of

without exception

True of all people or things being described. All employees without exception will be required to undergo and pass a drug screening test before their probationary period is over. Without exception, every single household in the state is being overcharged for their water usage.
See also: exception, without
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

The exception proves the rule.

Prov. Something that does not follow a rule shows that the rule exists. (Often used facetiously, to justify some rule you have proposed but which someone else has listed exceptions. From a Latin phrase meaning that an exception tests a rule.) Ellen: Men are always rude. Jane: But Alan's always polite. And Larry and Ted are polite, too. Ellen: They're just the exceptions that prove the rule. Bill: All the shows on TV are aimed at people with low intelligence. Alan: What about that news program you like to watch? Bill: The exception proves the rule.
See also: exception, prove, rule

make an exception (for someone)

to suspend a rule or practice for someone in a single instance. Please make an exception just this once. The rule is a good one, and I will not make an exception for anyone.
See also: exception, make

take exception

 (to something)
1. to take offense at something. I must take exception to your remark. Sue took exception to Fred's characterization of Bill as a cheapskate.
2. to disagree with something. I have to take exception to the figure you quoted. The manager took exception to the statement about having only three employees.
See also: exception, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

except for

Also, with the exception of. Other than, were it not for. For example, Except for Jack, everyone came to the party, or With the exception of the weather, everything went extremely well. [c. 1600]
See also: except, for

exception proves the rule, the

An instance that does not obey a rule shows that the rule exists. For example, John's much shorter than average but excels at basketball-the exception proves the rule . This seemingly paradoxical phrase is the converse of the older idea that every rule has an exception. [Mid-1600s]
See also: exception, prove

make an exception

Exempt someone or something from a general rule or practice, as in Because it's your birthday, I'll make an exception and let you stay up as late as you want . This expression was first recorded about 1391.
See also: exception, make

take exception to

Disagree with, object to, as in I take exception to that remark about unfair practices. This idiom, first recorded in 1542, uses exception in the sense of "objection," a meaning obsolete except in a few phrases.
See also: exception, take, to
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

the exception that proves the rule

You say that something is the exception that proves the rule to mean that the example that you have just mentioned is not normal and is the opposite of what you usually find. Towers should generally be arranged in clusters, but the Post Office Tower was the exception that proved the rule — it needs to stand alone so that its signals are not interrupted. The most creative minds are often said to be the product of a problematic childhood, but Hornby must be the exception that proves the rule. Note: `Prove' here means `to test by experiment or analysis' rather than `to establish as true'. So, the meaning is that an exception tests a rule, not that it establishes the rule as true in all other situations.
See also: exception, prove, rule, that
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

the exception that proves the rule

a particular case that is so unusual that it is evidence of the validity of the rule that generally applies.
This phrase comes from the Latin legal maxim exceptio probat regulum in casibus non exceptis ‘exception proves the rule in the cases not excepted’. This in fact meant that the recognition of something as an exception proved the existence of a rule, but the idiom is popularly used or understood to mean ‘a person or thing that does not conform to the general rule affecting others of that class’
1998 Spectator The success of The Full Monty in the United States is an exception which proves the rule. On such lucky breaks, industries and economies are not built.
See also: exception, prove, rule, that
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the exˈception that proves the ˈrule

(saying) people say that something is the exception that proves the rule when they are stating something that seems to be different from the normal situation, but they mean that the normal situation remains true in general: English people are supposed to be very reserved, but Pete is the exception that proves the rule — he’ll chat to anyone!
See also: exception, prove, rule, that

make an exˈception

allow somebody not to follow the usual rule on one occasion: Children are not usually allowed in, but I’m prepared to make an exception in this case.
See also: exception, make

take exˈception to something

be very offended by a remark, suggestion, etc: I take great exception to your suggestion that I only did this for the money.
See also: exception, something, take, to

with the exˈception of

except; not including: All his novels are set in Italy with the exception of his last.
See also: exception, of

without exˈception

used to emphasize that the statement you are making is always true and everyone or everything is included: All students without exception must take the English examination.
See also: exception, without
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

except for

Were it not for: I would join you except for my cold.
See also: except, for

take exception

To express opposition by argument; object to: took exception to the prosecutor's line of questioning.
See also: exception, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

exception proves the rule, the

Although something may not conform to it, the general rule is still valid. This term originated in the 1500s and is considered a proverb. Playwright Thomas Heywood used it in The Rape of Lucrece (1608), “If the general rule have no exceptions, thou wilt have an empty consistory.” However, in the 1800s several scholars maintained that “proves” in this phrase actually means “tests” (and not “verifies”). Whichever is intended, the phrase is still used, as in “Jane was the only woman who opposed this measure; well, the exception proves the rule.”
See also: exception, prove
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The guidance notes, "...a trading partner that received an "undue economic hardship" waiver may be asked to submit updated financial information demonstrating that the circumstances supporting the original waiver decision still exist." A waiver, exception, or exemption that is deemed inappropriate during the review will be terminated.
To handle a crash caused by the readout of an external function, we used selective simulation execution; that is, we real execute the external function and system function where exceptions arise, while performing simulate execution for functions in which no exceptions occur.
In some instances, particularly in involved cases with significant amounts of evidence and issues, it may not be possible to file the exceptions by the initial deadline.
The number of exceptions thrown in Java methods, which are not within the scope of try block, is shown in column 6 of Table 5.
To analyze this matter, the Court uses a statutory interpretation approach to determine whether the noncommercial tort exception applies to this case and cases of this nature.
NOTE: The cap exception is retroactive to the beginning of 2006.
Leland, legal counsel for the group, said that, "Absent a compelling government interest to regulate the specific religious activity of a specific religious entity, the federal government must accommodate religious exercise and make exceptions to otherwise applicable laws."
The Supreme Court recognizes the need for law enforcement to search in the face of an emergency (4) or incident to arrest, (5) following the lawful seizure of property to inventory its contents, (6) based on the voluntary consent of a party who has authority over the property, and pursuant to the motor vehicle exception. (7) This article focuses on the scope of the authority when engaged in the stop of a vehicle and when, during this stop, information is developed leading to a search.
All of this enables exceptions and issues to be proactively addressed before they flow downstream and cause revenue leakage, high DSOs and customer dissatisfaction--and become costly to resolve.
The federal bank, thrift institution, and credit union regulatory agencies issued on June 6, 2005, interim final rules under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) that create exceptions to the statutory prohibition against obtaining or using medical information in connection with credit eligibility determinations.
One just concern of reinsurers is the sheer volume of underwriting exceptions being made by direct writers.
If so, would you have some temporary exceptions such as for special shocks (price of oil, etc.)?
However, there are several exceptions to this additional tax.