et tu, Brute?

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et tu, Brute?

A phrase used to express one's dismay at mistreatment or betrayal. The phrase is attributed to Julius Caesar, whose close friend Brutus conspired to murder him. The Latin phrase translates to, "And you, Brutus?" Wow, even you're voting against me, Sarah—my own sister? Et tu, Brute?
See also: ET
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

et tu, Brute?

(pronounced “Bru-TAY”) An expression of feeling betrayed. Marcus Brutus was one of the conspirators against Julius Caesar, formerly his great friend. Shakespeare's drama has Caesar's dying words the Latin for “and you, Brutus?” meaning “and you too” and uttered with tragic resignation as the Roman emperor recognized Brutus as one of his assassins.
See also: ET
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
For others, it was the 'Et tu, Brute' moment of Sri Lankan politics.
Shocked at his friend's betrayal, Caesar's last words were, "Et tu, Brute?", which means, "Even you, Brutus?"
Early in his career he dispatched an uprising in Eastern Europe and sent a letter to the Roman Senate saying, "I came; I saw; I conquered." His last words, according to Shakespeare, were also brief and to-the-point: "Et tu, Brute."
On the one hand, Christ can turn to us and tell us, in the final words of Julius Caesar to Brutus, when he was assassinated: 'Et tu, Brute? (You, too, Brutus?)'
Caesar's famous phrase 'Et tu, Brute?' was an invention of Shakespeare - and he wasn't even born by Caesarian section.
Caesar's dying words "Et tu, Brute?'' mean "And you too, Brutus?''.
revolution: no"I tu" lover revolting against "me too"-ism and conformistspelling(Et tu, brute?)
Another phrase stemming from the assassination of Julius Caesar, "Et tu, Brute?," is credited to Shakespeare's play, although it was a popular saying during the Bard's life.
Et tu, Brute? were the last words of Julius Caesar, the fallen hero, despised for his dictatorship as Marcus Brutus held the assassin's dagger.
Myths are debunked -- Julius Caesar's last words weren't "Et tu, Brute?" she writes.
Et tu, Brute? But now the thaw has kicked in and Channel 4 viewers will get to enjoy live action over fences and hurdles from Kempton and Huntingdon, whose frozen Friday fixture has been given a day's grace and will be staged today, always assuming it survives an 8am inspection (all is forgiven, BHA).
Et Tu, Brute: A Short History of Political Murder by Greg Woolf (Harvard, 978-0-674-02684-1).
* Et tu, Brute? Shame on you, for even implying that Ralph Nader should not run.
"Et tu, Brute?" (Caesar in Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar')