England


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shut (one's) eyes and think of England

1. Typically of a woman (specifically a wife), to endure unwanted or unpleasant sexual intercourse—as out of a sense of duty or obligation—by distracting oneself with more pleasant thoughts. Refers to alleged advice for wives in the 19th and early 20th centuries that placed unwanted sexual activity as the price of the security of marriage. Primarily heard in UK. It's horrible to think that women who were not attracted to their husbands, but who depended on the security of their marriage, were once told to simply shut their eyes and think of England to satisfy their husband's desires.
2. By extension, to endure any unpleasant or unwanted task or experience by thinking of one's duty, the benefits of the experience, or by distracting oneself with more pleasant thoughts. Primarily heard in UK. Whenever I have to have a tooth filled at the dentist, I just shut my eyes and think of England.
See also: and, England, eye, of, shut, think

lie back and think of England

1. Typically of a woman (specifically a wife), to endure unwanted or unpleasant sexual intercourse—as out of a sense of duty or obligation—by distracting oneself with more pleasant thoughts. Refers to alleged advice for wives in the 19th and early 20th centuries that placed unwanted sexual activity as the price of the security of marriage. Primarily heard in UK. It's horrible to think that women who were not attracted to their husbands, but who depended on the security of their marriage, were once told to simply lie back and think of England to satisfy their husband's desires.
2. By extension, to endure any unpleasant or unwanted task or experience by of thinking one's duty, the benefits of the experience, or by distracting oneself with more pleasant thoughts. Primarily heard in UK. Whenever I have to have a tooth filled at the dentist, I just lie back and think of England.
See also: and, back, England, lie, of, think

for England

A lot. Often used in the phrase "talk for England," meaning to talk a lot. Whenever I'm with Miranda, she just talks for England, and I can't get a word in!
See also: England

close (one's) eyes and think of England

1. Typically of a woman (specifically a wife), to endure unwanted or unpleasant sexual intercourse—as out of a sense of duty or obligation—by distracting oneself with more pleasant thoughts. Refers to alleged advice for wives in the 19th and early 20th centuries, placing unwanted sexual activity as the price of the security of marriage. Primarily heard in UK. It's horrible to think that women who were not attracted to their husbands, but who depended on the security of their marriage, were once told to simply close their eyes and think of England to satisfy his desires.
2. By extension, to endure any unpleasant or unwanted task or experience by thinking of one's duty, the benefits of the experience, or by distracting oneself with more pleasant thoughts. Primarily heard in UK. Whenever I have to have a tooth filled at the dentist, I just close my eyes and think of England.
See also: and, close, England, eye, of, think

he/she can talk/eat, etc. for England

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you say that someone can talk/eat, etc. for England, you mean that they do that thing a lot. That woman can talk for England.
See also: can, England, he, she, talk

lie back and think of England

(of a woman) submit stoically to uncongenial but unavoidable sexual intercourse, especially with a husband. British
See also: and, back, England, lie, of, think
References in classic literature ?
He was the chief person in the plantation, and had the only comfortable house which the new-comers had beheld since they left England. So now, children, you must imagine Grandfather's chair in the midst of a new scene.
The Lady Arbella, looking paler than she did on shipboard, is sitting in her chair, and thinking mournfully of far-off England. She rises and goes to the window.
"Perhaps," said Laurence, "if they had found no need of burial-grounds here, they would have been glad, after a few years, to go back to England."
There is no longer a Popish tyrant on the throne of England, and by to-morrow noon, his name shall be a byword in this very street, where ye would make it a word of terror.
Before another sunset, the Governor, and all that rode so proudly with him, were prisoners, and long ere it was known that James had abdicated, King William was proclaimed throughout New England.
But should domestic tyranny oppress us, or the invader's step pollute our soil, still may the Gray Champion come, for he is the type of New England's hereditary spirit; and his shadowy march, on the eve of danger, must ever be the pledge, that New England's sons will vindicate their ancestry.
Louis found the king of England seated in the same place where he had left him.
England v Holland, 1993: The two games were vital to both sides' hopes of making the 1994 World Cup.
However, a woeful performance at Wembley and a solitary Don Hutchison goal saw the Scots claim a deserved victory and their first win in England since May 1981.
England 1 Holland 1: Ryan Babel sends Scott Carson the wrong way
Even England's Cardinal Cormac Murphy O'Connor, the one person more committed to seeking unity with the Anglicans than any other Catholic, lamented that full Anglican-Catholic unity will now be "out of reach." For years the Cardinal had maintained that the process toward unity was a "road without exit" (Zenit, June 12).
At first, Peyton's voice was one of moderation, determined to maintain Virginia's right of self-government within the larger scheme of colonial ties to England. Edmund's father, John, the clerk of the burgesses, shared his brother's outlook and his desire to maintain peace while asserting Virginia's right to govern itself.
The Church of England will not be able to commend the gospel effectively flits structures embody sexism in a way that contemporary society no longer finds acceptable," the working party said in its report, Women Bishops in the Church of England?, published Nov.
An Erasmian spirit of reform, Shakespeare's Tribe argues, infused the idea of the theater in post-Reformation England--and the theater's idea of England as a Christian nation.