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et al.

And others. It is an abbreviation of a Latin phrase (et alii, et aliae or et alia, depending on the number and gender) and is typically used after a name or list of names to indicate the inclusion of others. This research was carried out by Richards et al.
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et alia

From Latin, the neuter plural form of "and others," used after a thing or list of things to indicate the inclusion of others. Typically used in formal or scholarly writing, though it is usually shortened to "et al." The government has promised to crack down on the top companies in the world—Bike Roh Soft, Floogle, Slamazon, et alia—for their failure to pay their appropriate share of taxes. The governments of Germany et al. renewed their commitment to tackling the issues facing the European Union.
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et aliae

From Latin, the feminine plural form of "and others," used after a female name or list of names to indicate the inclusion of others. Typically used in more formal or scholarly writing, though it is usually shortened to "et al." The authors of the paper—Drs. Cartright, Smith, Robinson, et aliae—are among the top female scientists in the world. This study was carried out by Richards et aliae.
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et alibi

From Latin, meaning "and elsewhere," used after a list to indicate the inclusion of other locations. Used especially in reference to multiple additional pages or passages within a text. Sometimes shortened to "et al." Examples of this philosophical stance can be found in Carter (Primer on Metaphysics, pp. 232, 245, 347, et alibi). Countries throughout continental Europe—Germany, France, Spain, et al.—have been impacted by the drought.
See also: alibi, ET

et alii

From Latin, the masculine plural form of "and others," used after a male name or list of male or mixed-gender names to indicate the inclusion of others. Typically used in more formal or scholarly writing, though it is usually shortened to "et al." The authors of the paper—Drs. Cartright, Smith, Robinson, et al.—are among the top scientists in the world. This study was carried out by Richards et alii.
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et cetera

A Latin phrase literally meaning "and the others," used to allude to or include other similar things without naming them directly. Sometimes spelled as a single word. I didn't do much today besides housework—you know, the laundry, the dishes, et cetera. We produce high-quality images you can use for your company's website, social media accounts, marketing materials, etcetera.
See also: cetera, ET

et con.

A shortening of the Latin phrase et conjunx, meaning "and husband," used in law to indicate the implicit inclusion of a woman's husband, as in a legal document or case. The property was transferred by deed to Virginia Smith et con. on 03 June, 1998. The Supreme Court Case "Richardson et con. v. Colorado" was decided with a unanimous 7–0 verdict in favor of the plaintiff. When reached for comment, Mrs. Richardson said she was overjoyed with the result.
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et hoc genus omne

From Latin, meaning "and all this/that sort of thing," used to allude to or include other similar things without naming them directly. The government has promised to crack down on the top companies in the world—Bike Roh Soft, Floogle, Slamazon, et hoc genus omne—for their failure to pay their appropriate share of taxes. The plot is a tired treatise on the burdens facing the affluent elite—lack of purpose, estranged relationships, et hoc genus omne.
See also: ET, genus, hoc, omne

et id genus omne

From Latin, meaning "and all of that kind," used to allude to or include other similar people or things without naming them directly. The class focuses on the usual suspects of modernist poets—Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, et id genus omne. The plot, such as it is, acts as a treatise on such tired burdens facing the affluent elite as lack of purpose in life, estranged relationships, et id genus omne.
See also: ET, genus, id, omne

et seq.

A shortening of the Latin phrase et sequens, meaning "and the following item or items," used especially in law in reference to additional page numbers or passages within a text. Examples of this legal precedence can be found in Monroe v. Tilda (p. 232 et seq.). The policy was repealed in the Cleaner Living Act § 24-33.5-701 et seq. in 2013.
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et seqq.

A shortening of the Latin phrase et sequentia, meaning "and the following items," used especially in law in reference to additional page numbers or passages within a text. A less common variant of "et seq." (et sequens), meaning "and the following item or items." Examples of this legal precedence can be found in Monroe v. Tilda (p. 232 et seqq.). The policy was repealed in the Cleaner Living Act § 24-33.5-701 et seqq. in 2013.
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et tu, Brute?

A phrase used to express one's dismay at mistreatment or betrayal. The phrase is attributed to Julius Caesar, whose close friend Brutus conspired to murder him. The Latin phrase translates to, "And you, Brutus?" Wow, even you're voting against me, Sarah—my own sister? Et tu, Brute?
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et ux.

A shortening of the Latin phrase et uxor, meaning "and the/his wife," used in law to indicate the implicit inclusion of a man's wife, as in a legal document or case. The property was transferred by deed to Harry Smith et ux. on 12 January 1978. The Supreme Court Case "Richardson et ux. v. Colorado" was decided with a unanimous 7–0 verdict in favor of the plaintiff. When reached for comment, Mr. Richardson said he was overjoyed with the result.
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et vir

From Latin, literally meaning "and the man" but taken to mean "and the husband," used in law to indicate the implicit inclusion of a woman's husband, as in a legal document or case. The property was transferred by deed to Virginia Smith et vir on 03 June 1998. The Supreme Court Case "Richardson et vir v. Colorado" was decided with a unanimous 7–0 verdict in favor of the plaintiff. When reached for comment, Mrs. Richardson said she was overjoyed with the result.
See also: ET
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

et tu, Brute!

You, my so-called friend, are also betraying me. This expression is generally credited to Shakespeare, who used the exact Latin locution (literally, “and you, Brutus”) in Julius Caesar (3.1) in 1599. However, Shakespeare actually was loosely quoting the real Julius Caesar, who reportedly said, “You too, my child?” when Marcus Brutus stabbed him in 44 b.c. Caesar made this dying remark in Greek (according to Suetonius’s account). Incidentally, “Brute” did not signify “brute” in the sense of animal; it simply is the proper Latin case for this name. A more recent version, with friends like that/you, who needs enemies, became current in America in the 1960s. It usually is a response to a far less dire betrayal—a tactless remark by a friend, for example.
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The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

et tu, Brute?

(pronounced “Bru-TAY”) An expression of feeling betrayed. Marcus Brutus was one of the conspirators against Julius Caesar, formerly his great friend. Shakespeare's drama has Caesar's dying words the Latin for “and you, Brutus?” meaning “and you too” and uttered with tragic resignation as the Roman emperor recognized Brutus as one of his assassins.
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Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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